Reconnecting America People * Places * Possibility

Are We There Yet? Stories

In Are We There Yet, we describe real-life examples we have collected -- and in some instances experienced first-hand -- of leadership, innovation and collaboration occurring in all sorts of places and by all kinds of people. From Oklahoma City to Des Moines to Seattle, we have compiled stories that illustrate forward thinking with tangible outcomes -- getting people to work, reducing obesity and engaging in a productive civic dialogue. These stories and anecdotes aren’t tinged blue or red; these are stories of people employing creativity, ingenuity and collaboration to make our cities and regions better places to live.

  • Living

  • Working

  • Moving

  • Thriving

Create affordable communities with transportation choices that:

  • Maximize the number of households … who live in fixed-guideway transit station areas and opportunity areas
  • Maximize the range of households … who live in fixed-guideway transit station areas and opportunity areas
  • Preserve and stabilize existing neighborhoods ... in fixed-guideway transit station areas and opportunity areas
  • Focus future growth in opportunity areas
City State Category Description
Montgomery AL Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Moderately Priced Dwelling Unit Program: A goal of the Montgomery County Housing Policy states that affordable housing should be available to people of all incomes. To help achieve this goal, the County Council passed the Moderately Priced Housing (MPH) Law in 1974. A provision of the MPH Law requires that between 12.5% and 15% of the houses in new subdivisions of 20 or more units be moderately priced dwelling units (MPDUs). The MPH Law requires that 40% of the MPDUs be offered to the Housing Opportunities Commission (HOC) and other non-profit housing agencies for use by low and moderate income families.
Phoenix AZ Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Also doing interesting work with NSP funds: LISC Phoenix determined early on in the foreclosure crisis that a collaborative effort would be necessary to create a scaleable program that could assist a significant number of home buyers to obtain affordable housing through the purchase of foreclosed homes in Maricopa County. The initial group of 10 non-profits that LISC assembled later expanded into the 14-member Sustainable Home Ownership Coalition (SHO Coalition). The SHO Coalition has assisted 775 families to purchase foreclosed homes since June 2008.
SHO Coalition members are key partners in all the local NSP programs. Furthermore, the SHO Coalition?s foreclosure response has grown from is original consumer-based model and has expanded to include neighborhood-based projects as part of local NSP programs. One of these neighborhood-based foreclosure projects is ReGreening Phoenix, which consists of the rehabilitation of 20 foreclosed properties concentrated in a target neighborhood using low-cost energy efficiency. Regreening Phoenix is evidence of the green development and other environmentally sound efforts that have been central to LISC?s work in recent years.
Phoenix AZ Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Phoenix TOD Fund, also a story about jurisdictional COLLABORATION between three cities along one light rail line: Their collaborative vision for TOD around light rail from Mayors in Phoenix, Tempe and Mesa is directly linked to a Sustainable Communities Development Fund. The Fund thus far has been financed by the Local Initiatives Support Corp. and Raza Development Fund putting in $10 million each. The Fund is a product of the Sustainable Communities Working Group, a partnership between leaders from state, regional and local housing, transportation, land-use and environmental agencies; and non-profit organizations. State Dept. of Housing an important player. I was told that the State changed their LIHTC criteria as being part of this collaborative, but I can?t verify online. Currently, Arizona?s threshold criteria requires that projects be located within 2 miles of public transportation. (As of 2010, Arizona was the only state to require some kind of transit proximity.)
Berkeley CA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Berkeley's condo conversion fee requires owners seeking to convert rental units to condominiums to pay an ?Affordable Housing Mitigation Fee? set at 12.5 percent of the sales price of the condominium. Other jurisdictions, such as San Francisco, assess a nominal fee for conversion, but place a numerical limit on the number of conversions allowed annually (200 per year in San Francisco). Applicants must also meet several conditions to win a permit for conversion. For example, conversions are only permitted in buildings with 2-6 units that also meet other requirements pertaining to eviction history and owner occupancy.
Emeryville CA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Citywide revolving loan fund for brownfield cleanup using EPA $$: runs the CIERRA (Capital Incentives for Emeryville's Redevelopment and Remediation) Revolving Loan Fund, which offers grants, low- and no-interest loans for site assessment and cleanup of small industrial and commercial sites. CIERRA focuses primarily on sites under 2 acres, which tend to be more difficult to redevelop than larger brownfield sites. Preference is given for the remediation and redevelopment of projects in lower-income neighborhoods. CIERRA is funded by a grant from the US Environmental Protection Agency.
Fremont CA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations The City of Fremont, California offers deferred impact fee payments. Deferrals of up to 18 months are available for affordable housing developments with at least 49 percent of the units affordable to very low to moderate-income households, and which have received financial support from the City and/or Redevelopment Agency for an amount equal to or greater than the amount of the development impact fees.
Sacramento CA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations California State Law?requires density bonuses to include affordable housing: In California, state law requires that local jurisdictions grant density bonuses of 20-35 percent for projects that make a certain percentage of their units affordable. Additionally, developers are also allowed a certain number of development ?concessions? or ?incentives? depending on affordability level. However, local governments can layer additional incentives to promote deeper levels of affordability, by increasing the density bonus or adding incentives such as reduced parking requirements.
Sacramento CA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Prop 1C- Fund for affordable housing development?
Sacramento CA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations State of California (and others) gives extra points in LIHTC program to project near transit: California?s LIHTC program provides additional points for projects that take on additional expenses while furthering public policy objectives. The program grants transit-accessible projects up to 7 out of 15 total points in its amenities category. Scoring is as follows (at www.treasurer.ca.gov/ctcac):
o 7 points: The project is part of a transit-oriented development strategy where there is a transit station, rail station, commuter rail station, or bus station, or bus stop within a quarter mile of the site, with service at least every 30 minutes during the hours of 7-9 a.m. and 4-6 p.m. The project?s density must exceed 25 units per acre.
o 6 points: The site is within a quarter mile of a transit station, rail station, commuter rail station or bus station, or bus stop with service at least every 30 minutes during the hours of 7-9 a.m. and 4-6 p.m.
o 5 points: The site is within a third of a mile of a bus stop with service at least every 30 minutes during the hours of 7-9 a.m. and 4-6 p.m.
o 4 points: The site is within 500 feet of a regular bus stop, or rapid transit system stop.
o 3 points: The site is within 1,500 feet of a regular bus stop or rapid transit system stop.
San Francisco CA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Bart?s policy change re: parking does not need 1:1 replacement when building TOD
San Francisco CA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations TOAH Fund
Denver CO Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Neighborhood Stabilization Program: The Denver region has also employed other creative methods to link affordable housing to new transit investment in the region. One new use of funds has been the City of Denver?s work in targeting Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) funds to transit corridors. NSP funds have helped replace funding for affordable housing that decreased when market downtown decreased availability of 9 percent tax credits/tax equity. Identifying properties that are at risk for losing their affordability criteria is another method being used by the City of Denver. The City?s Early Warning System requires owners of HUD-assisted properties to notify the city at least one year before opting out of affordability contracts.
Denver CO Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Reduced parking requirements for affordable housing/housing on small lots: Some cities such as Denver reduce parking requirements for housing located on small lots. The city?s MS-3 zoning overlay ? which applies to main streets and areas within 600 feet of enhanced transit corridors ? exempts lots smaller than 6,250 square feet from parking requirements altogether. For lots less than 18,750 square feet, the parking ratio for affordable housing units drops from .80 to.65 spaces per unit. For housing serving households earning less than 40 percent of AMI or less, and for units smaller than 550 square feet, parking requirements drop to zero.
Denver CO Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations RTD works to figure out how much affordable housing should be included when they redevelopment transit agency land: Ensuring the joint development opportunities result in affordable housing production has been another important component in building affordable housing near transit. The Denver region?s Regional Transportation District Board adopted an affordable housing policy to govern all joint development opportunities. The policy strongly promotes affordable housing, while at the same time respecting local control over land use and the diversity of housing needs among the many different cities within the bounds of the Transportation District. The policy outlines a process where RTD will work with the local jurisdiction to consider what the affordable housing goal for RTD owned parcels should be, and a key part of that process calls for a consideration of serving families earning between 0-50 percent of Area Median Income, due to the demonstrated need and the ridership boost at this level.
Denver CO Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations The Denver Housing Authority has been a major player in creating affordable housing along Denver?s Central Corridor. DHA is highly aware of the advantages that light rail can bring to their low income residents, and has been proactive in revamping the properties it owns that are near existing or future light rail. Along the Central Corridor in the Curtis Park neighborhood, DHA invested $132.1 million to demolish 286 units and replace them with 550 mixed-income units, 345 rental and 205 owner-occupied. In the Park Avenue/Benedict Park Place development, DHA invested $205.4 million to demolish 249 units and replace them with 873 mixed-income units, including 598 rental units. DHA has also played a central role in the development strategy created around the newest light rail line being constructed in the Denver region: the West Corridor. DHA owns three major properties along the future light rail line with over 786 units in all three developments. South Lincoln Homes in the Lincoln Park neighborhood is where the agency is currently focusing its efforts. South Lincoln Homes will have access to two of the region?s light rail lines when construction on the West Corridor is complete?the neighborhood already has a light rail station (10th and Osage) on the Southeast Corridor that connects to downtown and suburbs farther to the south of Denver.
Denver CO Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations TOD Fund: The City of Denver, Enterprise Community Partners, and the Urban Land Conservancy created a TOD Acquisition Fund. Opened in 2010, the fund was the first of this type in the country, and is promised to support the creation and preservation of up to 1,200 affordable housing units through strategic property acquisition in current and future transit corridors. TOD funds of this type can be a game-changing tool for affordable housing near transit, especially in slow economic climates. When property values are low, but the typical capital available to affordable housing developers is scarce, the TOD fund can fill the gap before light rail is operational and property values rise. The Fund is currently capitalized at $15 million, which is available to purchase and hold sites along transit corridors for up to five years. The creators of the fund hope to expand the fund?s capacity to $25 million, which will leverage over $100 million in local economic development activity. While this fund only applies to properties within the City of Denver at the moment, there has been an increasing amount of interest from regional agencies like DRCOG and from neighboring cities like Lakewood and Aurora. A new equity-focused collaborative in Denver hopes to help expand the fund to the regional scale.
Lakewood CO Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations West Corridor also example of collaboration and leadership: Both the Mayor of Lakewood (small suburban/urban town next to Denver) and the Public Housing Agencies have been leaders and forces behind this collaborative planning effort.
Athens GA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Community land trust: ALT has built over 100 affordable housing units and conserved 981 acres of land to date, and has recently taken on the challenge of what to do with large, half constructed neighborhood developments. ALT recently acquired one such foreclosed development, with plans to build affordable single-family homes on the property.
Atlanta GA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Affordable Housing Trust Fund along BeltLine project: The BeltLine is a transit and redevelopment project is supported by TIF revenue generated by the Tax Allocation District. 15 percent of revenue from the TAD is set-aside for the BeltLine Affordable Housing Trust fund, which currently has $8.8 million to support the development affordable housing. In time, the trust fund is predicted to gain $240 million. The BeltLine Partnership set a goal for the number of affordable units they would provide. The target gives a number of affordable units that the BeltLine Trust Fund will build or preserve along the light rail line and was set at 5,600 units. The target gives the group a figure to aim towards and ?keeps us honest? about how much subsidy is available on a per unit basis. Understanding the total dollar amount available made it clear to the Partnership that they would not be the main driver behind any one project and instead would be in a position to provide gap financing or offer other kinds of assistance.
Atlanta GA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Zoning adjustments to encourage diversity of housing types (family and nonfamily) near transit: The Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) has implemented two programs that encourage zoning adjustments for mixed income TOD. The Lifelong Communities Initiative is aimed at creating affordable and inclusive housing for a broad range of age groups and household sizes. One of the main strategies for implementing the LCI is to change zoning to encourage diverse uses, diverse housing types/sizes, and increased densities centered around robust public transit options. Lifelong Communities recommends implementing fair share housing and inclusionary zoning policies in order to maintain affordability, particularly for senior citizens.
Honolulu HI Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Community Challenge grant $$ to do TOD Housing Strategy: The City & County of Honolulu received a $2.38 million Community Challenge grant from HUD to develop a TOD Housing Strategy in anticipation of the new rapid transit line that is under construction. The strategy will emphasize lower income households and improving their access to opportunities in the region through transit and TOD.
Boise ID Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Treasure Valley Partnership manages sprawl: The Treasure Valley Partnership is an active group of elected officials working together to positively manage growth. The Partnership is comprised of Mayors and County Commissioners from Ada, Canyon and Owyhee Counties (Treasure Valley), Idaho who are concerned about their communities. Accomplishments include: $510,000 grant from the Federal Highway Administration to work with Idaho Smart Growth and COMPASS to develop alternative land use and transportation patterns in the valley; The Treasure Valley Regional Public Transit Authority it's development and passing by the voters in 1998 by 70% in both counties to work on a regional transit effort; Studies have been conducted of air quality and water drainage; with an agreement reached by the Partnership and the Idaho DEQ to work regionally on air shed problems; Specific Memorandums of Understanding between cities for improved emergency response and sharing of infrastructure facilities; Preserved 18 miles of railroad track leading into the spur line between Boise and Nampa
Chicago IL Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Foster job growth and residential development along existing transit: ?The South Suburban Mayors and Managers Association (SSMMA) will be awarded $2,351,848. The grant will fund a redevelopment plan in order to foster job growth in industries along the region?s well-established freight rail network while stimulating residential development along existing transit systems. Residents will enjoy the conveniences of walkable neighborhoods and savings from reduced transportation costs. A multijurisdictional strategy, known as the Chicago Southland Green TIME (Transit, Intermodal, Manufacturing, Environment) Zone, will allow older communities to leverage established rail infrastructure and a rich suburban bus network to foster more desirable, environmentally sustainable communities with strong connectivity between households, jobs, and amenities. A land bank will be developed that will allow SSMMA and its member communities to hold and maintain properties to prevent further deterioration, to assemble them for redevelopment and manage associated liabilities, then to convey the properties to new owners while ensuring their long-term use consistent with community goals, particularly housing affordability.?
Springfield IL Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations H+T Law: State passed Illinois Housing + Transportation Affordability Index Act in 2010 (first state to create legislation that links housing and transportation affordability to reduce the cost of living for our households). CNT did analysis of IDHA (248 developments approved by IHDA from 2001-2008 in the Chicago region) and evaluated whether the Housing Task Force, QAP, comprehensive housing plan and other policies have impacted transportation costs and job access of IHDA-financed developments. Analysis found that while T costs in IHDA Developments Outperform the Regional Average, transit Connectivity of IHDA Units Declined and Job Access of IHDA Units Declined. Recommendations included: Add transportation cost criteria to QAP, Leverage geographic set-asides to better target desirable neighborhood characteristics and reward walkable access to amenities, Improve Live Near Work scoring category with LED data, Refine TOD scoring category and give it more points, Allow TOD projects to qualify for a basis boost
Springfield IL Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations The State of Illinois Housing Development Authority (IHDA), with the support of the legislature, established an Affordable Housing Trust Fund (AHTF) in 1989. Fifty percent of the state's real estate transfer fee is set aside to provide funding for the AHTF. Granting $16-20 million annually to eligible sponsors and developers for the benefit of low- and very low-income Illinois households, the fund has supported nearly 20,000 housing units with almost $100 million since its inception.
Gulfport LA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations HUD SCRS grant for Sustainable Coastal Plan: received a $2 million Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant from HUD in fall 2010 to develop a Sustainable Coastal Plan for the communities in Mississippi that line the Gulf of Mexico. The plan will include 8 elements, notably equitable housing, integrated land use & modal planning, climate change adaptation, and sustainable infrastructure.
Boston MA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Boston Linkage Fee: Grassroots and tenants groups began pushing for a linkage fee in Boston in 1983 and the city began collecting the fee in 1984, despite legal challenges that required the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to pass legislation allowing the fee to be implemented. It applies to all new commercial developments over 100,000 square feet that require zoning relief and the funds go to the Neighborhood Housing Trust and the Neighborhood Jobs Trust (for job training). In 2001, with the support of Mayor Tom Menino, who called linkage "one of the best tools we have for creating affordable housing in the City," the fee was raised from $5.49 for housing and $1.09 for jobs to $7.18 and $1.44, respectively, and the payment schedule was shortened from 12 to 7 years. Boston's linkage program has collected $45 million.
Minneapolis MN Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Faith-based group ISAIAH has been a leader in the Central Corridor transit planning process in order to ensure the corridor's low income and minority communities have a voice in planning decisions. They group has been working on a health impact assessment for the Central Corridor light rail line and is advocating for the preservation and creation of affordable housing along the corridor. Win from the work so far has City (St Paul) Council resolution passed by Councilmember Stark when the Central Corridor Zoning Study was completed, requesting that further study be done on the following three areas, all of them related to zoning ordinance amendments: density bonuses for affordable housing and other public benefits; whether or not to allow detached accessory dwelling units on single-family lots along Central Corridor, and A possible requirement for large retail developments to include a certain minimum amount of smaller retail spaces to accommodate the space needs of small businesses
Minneapolis MN Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Twin Cities, Central Corridor Affordable Housing Strategy for Minneapolis and St. Paul: CCFC funding a planning initiative to do affordable housing strategy along the light rail line involving both cities. Underway now! The Central Corridor Funders Collaborative is a group of local and national funders that is working to support equitable TOD along the Central Corridor light rail line between Minneapolis and St. Paul. The core group of funders works with the community to devise plans and strategies that ensure access and opportunities for all people. The collaborative has four main outcomes: (1) access to affordable housing, (2) strong local economy, (3) vibrant transit-oriented places, and (4) effective coordination and collaboration. They have recently developed metrics to track these outcomes.
Asheville NC Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Land Bank with Tiger II $$: The City of Asheville received a $850,000 TIGER II grant in fall 2010 to create an affordable housing land bank as part of a master plan for revitalizing the East Riverside neighborhood. The City will revise its zoning code and take other steps to make the neighborhood more sustainable and provide more housing and transportation choices.
Charlotte NC Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Acquisition fund and land banking: established an acquisition fund to purchase land near the stations planned along its South Corridor light rail line to ensure the development of mixed-income, mixed-use TOD. The City Council capitalized the fund with an initial grant of $5 million. It is jointly managed by Coldwell Banker Commercial, the Charlotte Area Transit System, and several city departments (Economic Development, Planning, Neighborhood Development and Engineering). The first site, the Scaleybark station area, was purchased with the help of the city?s Housing Trust Fund, and development is required to meet a minimum affordable housing threshold.
Charlotte NC Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Community land trust, Long Term Affordability: Charlotte established an Affordable Housing Trust Fund to provide public funding to private developers in exchange for affordable units using a competitive bid process. The city has the flexibility to make the funds available as either a loan or grant for land acquisition or construction.
Trenton NJ Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Transit Village Initiative offers incentives to build near transit: The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) and NJ TRANSIT spearhead a multi-agency Smart Growth partnership known as the Transit Village Initiative. The Transit Village Initiative creates incentives for municipalities to redevelop or revitalize the areas around transit stations using design standards of TOD. Incentives include: 1) State of New Jersey commitment to the municipality's vision for redevelopment. 2) Coordination among the state agencies that make up the Transit Village Task Force. 3) Priority funding from some state agencies. 4) Technical assistance from some state agencies. 5) Eligibility for grants from the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT).
Cleveland OH Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Land bank: Authorized by a 1976 state statute and later enhanced by House Bill 603 in 1988, the Cleveland Land Bank (CLB) is considered a national model for the acquisition and disposition of tax-delinquent properties to productive use. Once tax-delinquent lots have been offered at auction and remain unsold, property identified by the City for development potential is transferred to the CLB. All other tax-delinquent property is transferred to the State of Ohio and sold at auction. Once in the CLB, property may be passed to a community development corporation (CDC) or private party who wishes to redevelop it. Prospective buyers of land bank parcels are required to submit a written proposal for reuse; proposals for new construction are given priority. While land is sold at "fair market value," financial assistance is available from sources such as the Cleveland Housing Trust Fund, the Neighborhood Development Activity Fund, and Cleveland Neighborhood Partnership Program (CNNP) comprised of LISC, The Enterprise Foundation and Neighborhood Progress, Inc., for CDC's looking to conduct development projects. On average, 500 CLB properties are sold to CDC's on an annual basis, and nearly 90% of all CDC properties in Cleveland are acquired from the land bank. The CLB has been praised for its transparency, organization, and close cooperation with CDC's in order to ease the disposition process.
Porland OR Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Development Agreement: Oregon law currently prohibits municipalities from adopting inclusionary zoning ordinances that mandate construction of affordable housing by developers. Nevertheless, when the City of Portland Development Commission (PDC) looked to develop the River District Urban Renewal Area, which encompasses the transit-rich Pearl District, in 1994, one of its goals was to encourage new housing development that reflected the income distribution of households in Portland. Therefore, the PDC entered into a development agreement with the master developer, Hoyt Street Properties, to build nearly 7,500 units with the following housing target goals: 33% upper income, 20% middle income, 20% moderate income, 13% low income, and 14% extremely low income. Despite the fact that moderate and low income households were still underserved in the Pearl District as of the latest housing report in 2006, overall PDC considers Hoyt compliant in meeting a very detailed mixed-income housing goal.
Pittsburgh PA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations East Liberty Development, Inc. (EDLI) and their partners have helped lead the charge on reinvestment in East Liberty. In 1999, ELDI helped create a Community Redevelopment Plan for the neighborhood that could lead development for the next 10 years. Transit proximity has helped EDI support their goals of building mixed-use, mixed-income, higher density development. The first major accomplishment for ELDI after creating that plan was to invest in a project in order to bring a Whole Foods to Centre Avenue. With backing from local partners, the CDC did most of the upfront development of the property, and Whole Foods moved into the space. This project ended up being the first of many that created a sense of growing momentum in the neighborhood. In the end, the return on ELDI?s investment helped the organization double in size, generate revenues to implement a larger community plan, and acquire properties for future development.
One local Pittsburgh supporter of ELDI is the Pittsburgh Partnership for Neighborhood Development (PPND). This group supported the development of the East End Growth Fund, a pool of pre-development funds from local foundations, banks and non-profits. The Fund allowed ELDI to assemble development sites, set design guidelines, and match developments to community goals. Among those goals was significant investment in local housing. PPND also helped support an ELDI initiative to ?acquire and mothball? thirty abandoned houses. After purchasing the homes, EDDI transferred their ownership to responsible residents, filling in blocks that had struggled with vacancies.
Pittsburgh PA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations The Housing Authority of the City of Pittsburgh (HACP) has also been an important partner in neighborhood redevelopment. Partnering with the City?s Urban Redevelopment Agency and the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency, HACP has helped build 533 apartments and townhouses for low-income residents in the East Liberty community. To attract private contractors, who find developing the small lots typical in the East Liberty neighborhood, the agency does the majority of the pre-development work, dealing with zoning, water, and sewer issues before a property goes out for development.
West Chester PA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Another example is West Chester, Pennsylvania, where nearly 90 percent of the town is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. West Chester's old-town charm attracts individuals of all ages, including West Chester University students, young professionals, families and empty-nesters who enjoy its walk-ability and sense of community. Its downtown is a true destination, offering restaurants, shops, art galleries, and year-round special events. West Chester is also in the Classic Towns program
Providence RI Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations story of developing a hotel into mixed-income housing using variety of funds - The central business district in Providence is in the midst of a slow but steady revival with increasing business investment and housing development. Unfortunately, much of the housing that has been built or planned consists of high priced or luxury units that are unaffordable for most. However, in 2005, a local arts organization called AS220 saw an opportunity to develop affordable housing in the heart of transit-rich downtown. AS220 purchased the Dreyfus Hotel, which had been sitting vacant for some time, from Johnson & Wales University and, through the Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston's Affordable Housing Program, received a $300,000 grant to restore the building and a $710,047 subsidized advance loan. With the help of other funding sources including state and federal tax credits, local development funds, and HUD's HOME program, which is targeted for funding housing development in transit zones, the Dreyfus now contains 11 affordable live-work spaces for very low- and low-income artists, three market-rate units, as well as 10 work studios, gallery space, and a first-floor restaurant.
Austin TX Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations The City of Austin, Texas provides fee waivers (in addition to expedited permitting) for transit-oriented, affordable housing. Fees are reduced on a sliding scale basis, based on portion of a development?s units priced for households earning less than 80 percent of AMI. Austin also provides expedited permit reviews to transit-oriented projects with affordable housing as part of its SMART program (Safe, Mixed-Income, Accessible, Reasonably-Priced, Transit-Oriented). During the first three years of the program, the average completion time for SMART Housing reviews was approximately half the time of conventional reviews. In the Bay Area, permitting processes could be fast tracked for all housing developments proposed for transit zones, or just for affordable housing within walking distance of transit.
Salt Lake City UT Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations HUD Regional Planning money to do Regional Affordable Housing + Transportation Plan: will ensure that the 2040 Vision?s principles to provide a range of housing options for people of all life stages and incomes is implemented. The study will examine existing municipal housing plans, assess the current and projected supply of and demand for different types of housing, and recommend how a larger share of the housing needed in the region can be provided in ?centers,? with multiple transportation options. Shaun Donovan made a recent trip to Salt Lake and praised the region?s plans to integrate a housing strategy with the region?s transit expansion plans, in effect leveraging the transit system to support new development and affordable housing.
Bellevue WA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations The town of Bellevue has created a transfer of development rights zone for it's TOD districts along the New East Link project that will provide affordable housing and greater number of amenities.
Seattle WA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Affordable Housing Levy: The City of Seattle?s Department of Housing has played a unique role in the affordable housing arena within the city. This ability is linked to the city?s affordable housing levy that was first passed by voters in the 1980s. The levy raises a significant amount of money for affordable housing within the city of Seattle and has allowed the Dept. of Housing to be a major player in financing the development of affordable housing. The levy needs to be approved by voters every so often, and was recently re-approved in 2009; this iteration is supposed to raise about $145 million over 7 years and preserve nearly 1,700 affordable units for vulnerable populations.
Seattle WA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Seattle Housing Authority has also been engaged in investment around the corridor. Before construction on the line began, the SHA built a Hope VI project near and existing station and has worked on another HOPE VI project along the line. The agency has also been involved in preservation transactions.
Seattle WA Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations The City of Seattle has created transfer of development rights zone for it's TOD districts. Amazon.com headquarters swapped utilized this to preserve existing units.
Randolph County WV Expand affordability by focusing new investments/housing in transit-rich locations Housing and transportation plan aimed at seniors: Community Challenge/TIGER II $$ to support two localized plans in the county seat of Elkins, in two mixed-income neighborhoods that are close to jobs, schools, and in-town amenities. Randolph County is a rural county with a population of 28,000, with Elkins serving as the economic and healthcare hub. Bus + focus on increasing walking and biking trips between a mixed-income residential area and a nearby commercial district and farmland preservation in the county. Identify employment, commuter, green space, and the availability and affordability of location-efficient rental and for-sale housing. Build environment that supports aging in place.
Fresno CA Focus growth in places with good access to opportunity Compact development outside of major urban areas: The San Joaquin Valley Blueprint is a regional plan for the central California region that includes Fresno, Bakersfield, Stockton, and other communities. The region received a $4 million Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant from HUD in fall 2010 to implement the Blueprint, with additional support from California State University and the Fresno Foundation.
Indianapolis IN Focus growth in places with good access to opportunity Zoning reform: The City of Indianapolis received a $1.2 million Community Challenge grant from HUD in fall 2010 to update its zoning code (Reignite Indy). New zoning is expected to increase gross density and increase brownfield redevelopment and permitting activity in each of the prototype neighborhood areas.
Covington KY Focus growth in places with good access to opportunity Downtown action plan: HUD Community Challenge $$ for the City of Covington. ?Covington will create a Downtown Action Plan?increase the number of workers who live downtown near jobs, maximize use of local, state and federal funds for renovation/rehabilitation of vacant and/or underutilized older commercial buildings in commercial areas, leading to increased development within the existing urban core. Increased recreational spaces (such as parks and trails) and street improvements will lead to increased pedestrian activity.
Warrensburg MO Focus growth in places with good access to opportunity Small/rural town retrofit of highway to main street: HUD Community Challenge grant for $134,900. The Missouri Department of Transportation has initiated construction of a bypass for Highway 13/Maguire Street around the east side of Warrensburg, and will be transferring maintenance responsibilities of the existing roadway to the City of Warrensburg. The Highway 13/Maguire Street Corridor Study will analyze land use and economic development opportunities for new urban infill housing and mixed-use retail, and sustainable practices related to storm water management and green infrastructure design including the potential application of LEED for Neighborhood Development strategies for public and private development throughout the corridor in rural Missouri. Planning funds will help develop a community based vision for urban revitalization and public infrastructure investments to retrofit the Highway 13 /Maguire Street corridor from an auto-oriented highway into a multi-modal, context sensitive urban main street that integrates mixed-use pedestrian oriented land use, smart mobility solutions, and community activity centers.
Hattiesburg MS Focus growth in places with good access to opportunity Plan for mixed-use, mixed-income housing district near center of town/existing employment centers: HUD Community Challenge $$. New design for the Mid-Town area, market analyses and guidelines for financing new development. Residents will have the opportunity to determine the future of their community through public meetings and collaborative design
Claremont NH Focus growth in places with good access to opportunity Rezoning for City Center, infill development: HUD Community Challenge $$. Identify effective tools and practices to maintain its historic cityscape, encourage redevelopment to maximize use of existing infrastructure, encourage infill development, direct private investment and economic development to the downtown, and improve the quantity and quality of housing. The City will facilitate public involvement in the creation of a vision for the Center City, conduct a baseline inventory of existing property and housing, identify parcels for redevelopment and infill opportunities, model the Center City utilizing GIS data sets, and develop recommended changes to the city?s zoning ordinance. Process will identify areas in the town center for infill development to maximize use of existing infrastructure
Collingswood NJ Focus growth in places with good access to opportunity Collingswood, New Jersey, is a great example of a livable community. Walkable from one end of town to the other and served by the PATCO High Speed Rail Line, it offers a marvelous mix of shops, restaurants, entertainment options, an award-winning Farmers Market, and more. Collingswood is in the Classic Towns program.
Albuquerque NM Focus growth in places with good access to opportunity Designated Activity Centers: The City of Albuquerque has created an "Activity Center" zoning district, designed to become "vibrant, transit-oriented urban places that encourage walking to destinations throughout each center." The City's comprehensive plan identifies the location of urban centers eligible for this zoning change. The City has been working with the Mid-Region Council of Governments (the region's MPO) on creating station area plans along the Rail Runner route that will facilitate the development of activity centers near stations. The state legislature also is supportive of TOD, passing a legislative appropriate in 2006 to "plan, design, and improve land facilities located near a transit stop."
Cincinnati OH Focus growth in places with good access to opportunity Zoning reform for smart growth: The City of Cincinnati's Planning Department received a $2.4 million Community Challenge grant from HUD to update its zoning code and implement a TOD Demonstration project. The new zoning code will make it easier to develop high-density, mixed-use developments and will likely be form-based. It will also include a new inclusionary zoning provision.
Oklahoma City OK Focus growth in places with good access to opportunity Sales Tax for downtown revitalization leading to transit eventually: A taxpayer approved sales tax generated $300 million for major metropolitan area projects including the AT&T Bricktown Ballpark, the Bricktown Canal, the Ford Center, the Cox Convention Center, a trolley system, additional development along the Oklahoma River and a new downtown public library. It is significant to note that Oklahoma City voters renewed their sales tax increase several times in order to continue funding their initiatives. (Projects were paid for by the time they were completed; no debt was incurred and there was no burden on taxpayers to service bonds.) A few of Oklahoma City?s results include: (see downtown revitalization document for more)
Philadelphia PA Focus growth in places with good access to opportunity Anti-sprawl/smart growth agenda, focus on nodes: Regional plan that focuses new growth in the 100 livable communities that already exist in the region. Initiatives under this plan include: Classic Towns of Greater Philadelphia (fosters the growth of the region's older communities by promoting what makes each community a wonderful place to live, work, and play), Transportation & Community Development Initiative (intended to reverse the trends of disinvestment and decline in many of the region's core cities and developed communities. The program provides an opportunity for DVRPC to support local development and redevelopment efforts in individual municipalities of the Delaware Valley that implement municipal, county, state, and regional planning objectives; Efficient Growth for Growing Suburbs (provides grants to suburbs to improve the growth management and community design and optimize the efficiency of their existing and planned transportation network)


Chattanooga TN Focus growth in places with good access to opportunity Downtown revitalization?building residential spaces in the downtown: ?Starting in 1992 with the opening of the Tennessee Aquarium, just south of the riverfront, the city built walks, museums and other amenities, and in the process turned the city centre into an entertainment and residential destination.? Helped attract VW plant in 2010, went through an intensive planning process (Vision 2000), City paid for road improvements and an overhaul of sewers while private secto helped to transform riverfront wastelands into parklands.
San Francisco CA Preserve affordability in existing affordable neighborhoods HOPE VI in SF: In 2006, Mayor Gavin Newsom and the San Francisco Board of Supervisors authorized $95 million in local bond funding to launch HOPE SF, a program that aims to convert 8 public housing developments comprising 5,000 units in San Francisco into high-quality mixed-income communities. Early in 2010, infrastructure improvements and construction began at Hunters View, which will serve as the pilot site for HOPE SF. Whereas a major criticism of the federal HOPE VI program was that public housing residents were often permanently displaced as a result of construction, HOPE SF aims to address this challenge in two ways. First, all HOPE SF projects will be developed in phases so that residents can move into vacant units in other parts of the development and remain on site to the greatest extent possible. In the first phase at Hunters View, 55 families and 2 businesses were relocated successfully on site. Additionally, HOPE SF plans to provide one-for-one replacement of public housing so that there is no net loss of affordable housing for low income families in the community. By 2016, HOPE SF plans to invest $450 million in mixed income communities in San Francisco.
Denver CO Preserve affordability in existing affordable neighborhoods Early Warning System for expiring units: The City?s Early Warning System requires owners of HUD-assisted properties to notify the city at least one year before opting out of affordability contracts.
Denver CO Preserve affordability in existing affordable neighborhoods The newly formed ?Mile High Transit Opportunity Collaborative? is working together to ensure the creation of the region?s $6.7 billion FasTracks transit system benefits all communities in the region, including low-income populations. The Collaborative is partnership between local Denver nonprofits and local foundations. Their initial work is being supported in part by funding from the Ford Foundation, which recently announced that the Denver region would be receiving a Metropolitan Opportunity initiative grant. The Collaborative will use this grant money to ?make the case? for why equitable transit-oriented development (TOD) is important to the Denver region, emphasizing how transit increases people's access to affordable housing, employment opportunities, education and essential services.
Somerville MA Preserve affordability in existing affordable neighborhoods Specific building preserved: In 2008, the Somerville Community Corporation helped organize the residents of the Mt. Pleasant Apartments in Somerville, MA, advocate to preserve the affordability of their building?its original Federal Section 8 contract was set to expire in 2011. Through the Section 8 PPLP, the property owner received a loan commitment of up to $6.34 million to make needed repairs and protect the property's affordability at least until 2028. As of June 2008, 10 developments containing affordable 1,270 units had been preserved through the PPLP. (Somerville also received HUD Community Challenge $$ to do extensive station area planning and land bank for affordable housing around transit.)
Baltimore MD Preserve affordability in existing affordable neighborhoods Collaboration and Community Engagement: Baltimore Neighborhood Collaborative (group of funders) was working together before discussion about Red Line light rail began. Funded a ?transit around the nation? tour when Red Line was proposed to open discussion about implications for light rail?how to make it work for community. Seed of ?Community Compact,? now a national model for how to bring community together to articulate what they want out of light rail.
Minneapolis MN Preserve affordability in existing affordable neighborhoods Central Corridor Funder?s Collaborative: Many local funder?s working and funding groups to do work along the light rail and in those neighborhoods, made sense to come together to help fill gaps, provide information to enable informed decision making and help seek consensus. Helped support advocacy to include more stations in lower income areas, funding an affordable housing strategy that will tie Minneapolis and St. Paul?s strategies together, studying the possibility of a central corridor acquisition fund,
Seattle WA Preserve affordability in existing affordable neighborhoods Specific buildings and units preserved with various tools. Nonprofits buying land and existing units and working with City to rehab them: Local nonprofits have also been actively engaged in developing long term affordability around the corridor. This has been possible in part because the light rail line opened just as the economy was slowing. Because of this timing, land prices have not risen significantly, making it possible for nonprofits to purchase existing units or land. One strong actor along the Southeast Line has been the Mt Baker Housing Association. This CDC works primarily in the Rainier Valley neighborhood of Seattle, and performed an inventory of 350 buildings throughout the Southeast corridor, ranking them on their potential for acquisition and rehab. The inventory included details on the type of plumbing used if the building and the age of electrical systems to gain a thorough understanding of the costs of rehabilitation for each building.
    Preserve affordability in existing affordable neighborhoods Equity Collaboratives are springing up in regions around the country, as more regions recognize the importance of affordable housing near transit to the economic growth and stability of regions. These collaboratives are typically led by nonprofits and foundations that provide funding for affordable housing and advocate for policies that encourage mixed-income housing near transit. The Bay Area's Great Communities Collaborative was one of the first models of an equity collaborative, and since then collaboratives have sprung up in the Twin Cities (Central Corridor Funders Collaborative) and New York (One Region Funders Group). Seattle will create a Regional Equity Network as part of its Sustainable Communities Regional Planning grant, modeled after an existing local effort. Denver is also currently forming an equity collaborative, hoping to leverage the region's massive investment in transit with equitable development outcomes and improved access to opportunities for people of lower socioeconomic status.

Use transportation options to enhance regional economic growth that:

  • Provide more transit options for accessing our jobs
  • Cluster jobs to allow easier transit access
  • Retain and Attract New Regional Talent and firms
  • Provide access to a range of job opportunities
City State Category Description
Denver CO Encourage new jobs to cluster to allow for easier and sustainable transit access Efforts to concentrate jobs near transit: emerging policies that directly link location efficiency and economic development National market trends point to an increasing shift of office space back to cities. Denver has lured several companies downtown, including energy company SunCor and kidney dialysis manufacturer DaVita, as a result of its revitalization efforts around Union Station, which in a few years will be the hub of a massive regional mass transit network connecting the downtown with most surrounding suburbs. A DaVita spokesman told the Denver Post that it chose downtown Denver over other cities because of its central location and lower cost of living.
Washington DC Encourage new jobs to cluster to allow for easier and sustainable transit access Efforts to concentrate jobs near transit: emerging policies that directly link location efficiency and economic development In Washington, D.C., Kaiser Permanente just opened a new medical facility adjacent to Union station. , The facility offers primary and specialty care, full-service imaging, lab and pharmacy services, and outpatient services. In a press release, a spokesman for KP stated: ?We?re confident that all of our members who use the Kaiser Permanente Capitol Hill Medical Center, both those who live in DC and those who come into the city to work, will enjoy the convenience and comfort that the new facility will bring?It will be a cornerstone of health for the community, and a hallmark for customer service and quality care.? The same complex also houses the U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission and the American Chemistry Council.
Springfield IL Encourage new jobs to cluster to allow for easier and sustainable transit access Efforts to concentrate jobs near transit: emerging policies that directly link location efficiency and economic development In Illinois, the Location Efficiency Act provides a 10% tax credit to businesses selecting sites within one mile of affordable housing and public transportation. The incentives are part of a larger Economic Development for a Growing Economy (EDGE) program, which provides tax incentives for businesses to locate in Illinois when they are actively considering a competing location in another state. While this policy only applies to companies moving to Illinois from out-of-state, many of Illinois? largest employers are reconsidering their suburban office complexes outside Chicago and contemplating a move back to downtown.
Detroit MI Encourage new jobs to cluster to allow for easier and sustainable transit access Efforts to concentrate jobs near transit: emerging policies that directly link location efficiency and economic development National market trends point to an increasing shift of office space back to cities. In Michigan, Blue Cross Blue Shield is moving thousands of employees to downtown Detroit from the suburbs. The City of Detroit offered the company incentives, including free annual transit passes for all employees.
Trenton NJ Encourage new jobs to cluster to allow for easier and sustainable transit access Efforts to concentrate jobs near transit: emerging policies that directly link location efficiency and economic development The New Jersey Urban Transit Hub Tax Credit provides a tax credit to developers, landowners or tenants to encourage investment around heavy rail stations in nine urban municipalities. Capital investment must be at least $50M in a single business facility that employs at least 250 people onsite. Global electronics behemoth Panasonic is the latest global company to take advantage of the credit. After a threat to move out of the state, Panasonic announced in May 2011 that it was relocating its North American headquarters to a site adjacent to Newark Penn Station and taking advantage of approximately $102.4 million in tax credits as part of the program. , Approximately 800 employees will move to the new transit-oriented site from another nearby office in Secaucus, New Jersey. In an interview with Andrea Bernstein of Transportation Nation, Panasonic CEO Joe Taylor stated that the new site will provide its employees with more transportation options than driving. Because of the company?s commitment to sustainability, Taylor said he couldn?t ask 1,000 employees to drive to work every day. Newark Mayor Cory Booker added that four to five other companies have moved closer to transit stations as a result of the Urban Transit Hub Tax Credit, and that the move of Panasonic will help revitalize Newark?s downtown and generate renewed interest from other companies to relocate near transit. Newark is the hub of New Jersey?s transit system, so as more businesses locate there, more employees can utilize public transportation, thereby reducing congestion on the roads and saving employees money. It also puts companies closer to a larger labor pool in neighboring New York.
New York NY Encourage new jobs to cluster to allow for easier and sustainable transit access Efforts to concentrate jobs near transit: emerging policies that directly link location efficiency and economic development The announcement by UBS that it is considering relocating to Manhattan from Stamford, Connecticut may further accelerate this spatial shift in job locations. UBS moved from Wall Street to Stamford in the mid-1990s, where it built the largest trading floor in the world. Yet now it is having trouble remaining competitive with other large financial institutions in attraction new talent, as young professionals would rather live and work in New York City than its surrounding suburbs. UBS also is far away from many of its major clients, who balk at having to drive out to the suburban campus for appointments or sit on a train for an hour. As Stamford?s largest employer, the State of Connecticut stands to lose significant tax revenue if UBS decides to move, but with geographic preferences quickly changing and a new generation of young professionals mindful of sustainability and attracted to the city, moving back to the city may be the banking giant?s only option to stay on a level playing field with competitors.
Houston TX Encourage new jobs to cluster to allow for easier and sustainable transit access Efforts to concentrate jobs near transit: emerging policies that directly link location efficiency and economic development National market trends point to an increasing shift of office space back to cities. Energy company BG Group moved its U.S. headquarters from suburban Houston to downtown after surveying employees and finding that a more central location was more convenient. The company also saw its relocation as a way to recruit potential employees who want to live closer to the city.
National   Encourage new jobs to cluster to allow for easier and sustainable transit access Efforts to concentrate jobs near transit: emerging policies that directly link location efficiency and economic development At the federal level, there have been efforts to promote jobs near transit as well. In October 2009, President Obama issued Executive Order 13514, ? ?Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance,? which requires federal agencies to support sustainable communities by planning future federal facilities on sites that are ?pedestrian friendly, near existing employment centers, and accessible to public transit.? The order also emphasizes locations in existing central cities and rural communities. This federal Executive Order is important because the federal government is the nation?s largest landowner. It occupies nearly 500,000 buildings, operates more than 60,000 vehicles, employs more than 1.8 million civilians, and purchases more than $500 billion per year in goods and services.
Emeryville CA Make existing jobs accessible by transit Another Bay Area example shuttle program is the Emery-Go-Round, a private transportation service funded by business and commercial property owners in the City of Emeryville?s business improvement district. Businesses pay a special tax to fund public transportation throughout the district.
Los Angeles CA Make existing jobs accessible by transit Los Angeles? Warner Center is seeing new development opportunities arise as a result of the opening of the Orange Line bus rapid transit system. The major employment center sits on almost 1,000 acres outside of L.A., and there are plans to transform 47 acres into a sustainable urban neighborhood.
San Francisco CA Make existing jobs accessible by transit Building new fixed-guideway transit is expensive and just infeasible to connect some job centers. Yet there are other strategies in place around the country to provide less expensive commuting options to jobs, including transportation demand management (TDM) programs and employer-provided shuttle services. Firms in the technology industry tend to be on the cutting edge of providing increased options for getting to work. Facebook, Google, Apple, and Microsoft all offer shuttle services to their corporate campuses from surrounding areas. Genentech, a biotechnology firm in the Bay Area, offers bus service to a nearby BART station for its employees.m in the Bay Area, offers bus service to a nearby BART station for its employees.
San Ramon CA Make existing jobs accessible by transit The Bishop?s Ranch suburban office park in San Ramon, California, has seen tremendous success with its shuttle services. Approximately one-third of the 30,000 workers take public transportation to work, despite the office park?s exurban location in Silicon Valley. Transportation planners at the office park relied on creative marketing to make riding public transportation seem cool, and the businesses located there began to take pride in having their workers commute to work by bus.
Denver CO Make existing jobs accessible by transit Colleges and universities are also at the forefront of offering public transportation circulators to and from campus from surrounding areas. Many regional transit agencies also offer discounted or free passes for students and university employees. In Denver, the Regional Transportation District negotiates annually with several colleges and universities in the region to offer free transit service to all enrolled students. Students need only show a valid campus ID to ride all services, including bus and light rail. Schools that participate include those at the Auraria Campus in downtown Denver, which houses three academic institutions (University of Colorado Denver, Metro State, and the Community College of Denver); the University of Denver; and the Colorado School of Mines.
Atlanta GA Make existing jobs accessible by transit The City of Atlanta has plans to build a streetcar network through its downtown. It received $47.6 million from the DOT's TIGER II grant program to start construction on a 2.7-mile segment between Centennial Olympic Park and Woodruff Park.
Des Moines IA Make existing jobs accessible by transit The City of Des Moines is planning a new transit hub downtown to connect people to jobs in the central business district as well as major employment centers in the suburbs. It will also serve as a regional transit hub for bus service and eventually intercity high-speed rail service to Chicago, Minneapolis, and Omaha. The station will be the only public bicycle storage facility in downtown Des Moines as well. The station will serve as the center of a revitalized downtown and contribute to ongoing efforts to improve the vibrancy and attractiveness of downtown. The City was fortunate to receive a TIGER II grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation to fund the station?s construction. Congressman Leonard Boswell (D-IA), who represents Des Moines in the U.S. house of Representatives, stated in a press release: ?As more Iowans rely on public transportation, it is important that we make certain that service is up-to-date, reliable, and remains an enjoyable experience for riders,? said Boswell. ?In these difficult economic times, DART buses are an important transportation option for many in the metro area. Additionally, the federal funding secured for this project will filter down into private sector employment, helping to create jobs while we upgrade our infrastructure.? Public transportation ridership is growing rapidly in Des Moines, so the construction of this new transit hub is needed to accommodate riders and also make existing service more attractive. The Des Moines Area Regional Transit Authority (DART) estimates that ridership has grown 18% between 2007 to 2009, four times the national average.
Boston MA Make existing jobs accessible by transit Colleges and universities are also at the forefront of offering public transportation circulators to and from campus from surrounding areas. Many regional transit agencies also offer discounted or free passes for students and university employees. Boston University, which has eight stops along the MBTA?s Green ?B? Line, offers semester-long T passes at an 11% discount. BU also has a late-night shuttle service called ?The BUS? that runs along the T?s Green Line until 4:00 AM, well past the T?s closing of 12:30 AM.
Durham NC Make existing jobs accessible by transit The Research Triangle Park in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill region has a SmartCommute@rtp program to help employees in the sprawling employment center find alternatives to driving alone to work. The Park is home to 38,000 full-time workers, many in the technology and research & development industries. Several bus routes go through the park, but the region is so decentralized, with three major cities, that several different agencies provide services, and the result is a confusing patchwork of transit service. SmartCommute@rtp aims to make riding the bus an attractive option by providing information on service and also working with employers to give employees incentives to ride public transportation. Employers who sign up as members of SmartCommute@rtp are eligible to give employees free 10-ride passes to try out riding the bus. SmartCommute@rtp also operates as a transportation management association, so it provides rideshare matching services for car- and vanpooling, as well as information on walking and biking to, from, and within the park. To encourage alternative commuting and reduce congestion in the region, SmartCommute@rtp initiated the ?Best Workplaces for Commuters? awards program in 2004 to recognize employers who have internal programs designed to address congestion and reduce vehicle-miles traveled. Companies including IBM, Cisco, Nortel, and the U.S. EPA have all received this award.
Greensboro NC Make existing jobs accessible by transit Colleges and universities are also at the forefront of offering public transportation circulators to and from campus from surrounding areas. Many regional transit agencies also offer discounted or free passes for students and university employees. The University of North Carolina at Greensboro has on-campus car sharing and a free bus service. During a recent Commuter Challenge by the regional transit agency, more than half of the pledges were university students or employees. UNCG also launched an on-campus bike sharing service in fall 2010. The National Center for Transit Research named UNCG one of the Best Workplaces for Commuters in 2011.
Eugene OR Make existing jobs accessible by transit The city of Eugene is relatively small and is did not have enough money to build a streetcar or light rail. So they designed and built a rapid transit network using dedicated lanes for buses. The result is two lines that are now open and planning for a third. This is the smallest region in the country with rapid transit.
Portland OR Make existing jobs accessible by transit Colleges and universities are also at the forefront of offering public transportation circulators to and from campus from surrounding areas. Many regional transit agencies also offer discounted or free passes for students and university employees. Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon has a free campus shuttle system, Pioneer Express, that also provides hourly service to downtown Portland and a local supermarket
Austin TX Make existing jobs accessible by transit Colleges and universities are also at the forefront of offering public transportation circulators to and from campus from surrounding areas. Many regional transit agencies also offer discounted or free passes for students and university employees. The University of Texas at Austin has the largest university shuttle system in the United States, with fourteen routes and over 7.5 million annual passengers. Students, faculty and staff ride for free with a valid UT photo ID. The university also runs several regional shuttles to major housing and employment centers.
Dallas TX Make existing jobs accessible by transit Outside of Dallas, the Los Colinas job center, home to five Fortune 500 companies? global headquarters and over 2,000 other companies, will soon receive new light rail service from downtown Dallas and the region?s two airports, Love Field and D/FW International. The City of Irving plans to build a $250 million entertainment and retail center nearby, as well as a $600 million convention center. On the housing side, plans call for 3,400 single-family homes and 10,600 multifamily residential units.
Salt Lake City UT Make existing jobs accessible by transit In the Salt Lake City region, a new transit line to the southern suburbs has opened up new large-scale development opportunities around job centers. The Daybreak community is a 500-acre master-planned transit-oriented development in South Jordan, Utah, located on the Mountain View Corridor light rail line in the southern Salt Lake City region. The core of the TOD is an employment center, surrounded by residential neighborhoods. There is also a pedestrian-friendly regional shopping center. The site lies in the middle of a larger 4,000-acre master-planned community, built on greenfield land and surrounded by open space. The transit station is expected to open in 2012.
Salt Lake City UT Make existing jobs accessible by transit With 17 planned transit projects, four under construction and three more in various stages of engineering, rail expansion in Salt Lake City is going strong. The region has a midsized population (about 1.7 million) and geographically the planned network would stretch from Provo (and Brigham Young University) in the south through central Salt Lake City and up into Ogden in the north. Of the lines that have identified station locations, they all do a fairly good job of connecting to low-income workers and households. The Provo Orem BRT connects to the largest number of low-income workers (13,800) and low-income households (27,000), but the Mid Jordan Trax also connects a large number of lower-income households (about 24,500). For the most part, these lines are extensions to a network that connects the downtown core to some
of the major job and activity centers in the region. The scale and momentum of the planned transit seem reminiscent of Portland, but the political climate and regional governance in the Salt Lake region are very different. This offers a strong example of a politically conservative region that has held a strong commitment to transit. In 2008, Utah Transit Authority, the agency for the state, was able to hike fares by a quarter to avoid making massive service cuts as fuel costs rose. The surcharge shrinks and grows with the cost of energy creating an innovative funding source for when gas prices change. The region also serves as an example of the value of long-term planning. UTA General Manager John Inglish made a deal to purchase 175 miles of freight right of ways for $185 million in 2002 before specific alignments for new rail lines were even on the table, likely saving the region millions of dollars. Other regions such as Denver have had to bargain with freight railroads that know the region needs the lines to finish plans.
Funding for ?Front Lines? (a plan to build 70 miles of new rail transit in seven years) comes from a quarter-cent sales tax that was passed in 2006. Outside of that initiative, the Utah Transit Authority is also supporting or planning several smaller downtown connectors and circulator routes such as the Sugarhouse Trolley, Provo Orem BRT and Ogden Weber State Streetcar.
With 17 planned transit projects, four under construction and three more in various stages of engineering, rail expansion in Salt Lake City is going strong. The region has a midsized population (about 1.7 million) and geographically the planned network would stretch from Provo (and Brigham Young University) in the south through central Salt Lake City and up into Ogden in the north. Of the lines that have identified station locations, they all do a fairly good job of connecting to low-income workers and households. The Provo Orem BRT connects to the largest number of low-income workers (13,800) and low-income households (27,000), but the Mid Jordan Trax also connects a large number of lower-income households (about 24,500). For the most part, these lines are extensions to a network that connects the downtown core to some
of the major job and activity centers in the region. The scale and momentum of the planned transit seem reminiscent of Portland, but the political climate and regional governance in the Salt Lake region are very different. This offers a strong example of a politically conservative region that has held a strong commitment to transit. In 2008, Utah Transit Authority, the agency for the state, was able to hike fares by a quarter to avoid making massive service cuts as fuel costs rose. The surcharge shrinks and grows with the cost of energy creating an innovative funding source for when gas prices change. The region also serves as an example of the value of long-term planning. UTA General Manager John Inglish made a deal to purchase 175 miles of freight right of ways for $185 million in 2002 before specific alignments for new rail lines were even on the table, likely saving the region millions of dollars. Other regions such as Denver have had to bargain with freight railroads that know the region needs the lines to finish plans.
Funding for ?Front Lines? (a plan to build 70 miles of new rail transit in seven years) comes from a quarter-cent sales tax that was passed in 2006. Outside of that initiative, the Utah Transit Authority is also supporting or planning several smaller downtown connectors and circulator routes such as the Sugarhouse Trolley, Provo Orem BRT and Ogden Weber State Streetcar.
With 17 planned transit projects, four under construction and three more in various stages of engineering, rail expansion in Salt Lake City is going strong. The region has a midsized population (about 1.7 million) and geographically the planned network would stretch from Provo (and Brigham Young University) in the south through central Salt Lake City and up into Ogden in the north. Of the lines that have identified station locations, they all do a fairly good job of connecting to low-income workers and households. The Provo Orem BRT connects to the largest number of low-income workers (13,800) and low-income households (27,000), but the Mid Jordan Trax also connects a large number of lower-income households (about 24,500). For the most part, these lines are extensions to a network that connects the downtown core to some of the major job and activity centers in the region. The scale and momentum of the planned transit seem reminiscent of Portland, but the political climate and regional governance in the Salt Lake region are very different. This offers a strong example of a politically conservative region that has held a strong commitment to transit. In 2008, Utah Transit Authority, the agency for the state, was able to hike fares by a quarter to avoid making massive service cuts as fuel costs rose. The surcharge shrinks and grows with the cost of energy creating an innovative funding source for when gas prices change. The region also serves as an example of the value of long-term planning. UTA General Manager John Inglish made a deal to purchase 175 miles of freight right of ways for $185 million in 2002 before specific alignments for new rail lines were even on the table, likely saving the region millions of dollars. Other regions such as Denver have had to bargain with freight railroads that know the region needs the lines to finish plans. Funding for ?Front Lines? (a plan to build 70 miles of new rail transit in seven years) comes from a quarter-cent sales tax that was passed in 2006. Outside of that initiative, the Utah Transit Authority is also supporting or planning several smaller downtown connectors and circulator routes such as the Sugarhouse Trolley, Provo Orem BRT and Ogden Weber State Streetcar.
Tysons Corner VA Make existing jobs accessible by transit All eyes are on Tysons Corner, Virginia as it attempts to transform itself from an auto-oriented suburban job center outside Washington, DC into a transit-oriented city with a more balanced mix of housing, jobs, and retail destinations. Tysons Corner contains over 100,000 jobs, but currently only 17,000 people live nearby. The Metro Silver Line will bring four new transit stations through the area, and Fairfax County has prepared a comprehensive plan for redevelopment that focuses on compact, mixed-use development in several ?livable urban districts.? The goal is to reduce the jobs-to-household ratio from the current 13:1 to 4:1 by 2050, and reserve 20% of new housing units for moderate-income households. Over 2,000 local residents and business owners participated in the creation of the plan, which took over five years to create. In 2011, the American Planning Association awarded Fairfax County the Daniel Burnham Award for the best comprehensive plan of the year. Developers are already lining up to redevelop sites within the job center, with Cityline Partners announcing plans for two large-scale mixed-use TOD projects at two station areas in 2011.
Seattle WA Make existing jobs accessible by transit The City of Seattle has worked to redevelop Northgate, a struggling shopping mall site, into a mixed-use TOD. The City developed a comprehensive plan and design guidelines to facilitate redevelopment, and has strived to integrated sustainable stormwater infrastructure and open space onto the site. The site currently has a major bus transfer station that will one day be a light rail station on a planned northern extension of the existing LINK system. Developers took nine acres of surface parking and built 530 new units of mixed-income housing on the site, with 20% set aside as affordable units. , They also restored a creek that previously ran through the site and made it a focal point of redevelopment. The redevelopment of Northgate is far from finished, and with light rail access several years to a decade off, it might be awhile before the comprehensive plan is built out. Yet the success of such a large-scale mixed-use development on a former auto-oriented shopping mall site bodes well for future retrofit projects of this nature in regions around the country.
Madison WI Make existing jobs accessible by transit The 2020 Commuter Rail line in Madison, WI, serves as an example of small town planning for new transit. There is no existing fixed-guideway transit in the metro area, which is fairly small (about 600,000 people.) However, Madison serves as the state capital and is home to the University of Wisconsin, Madison, with about 42,000 students. The region also has a fairly dense center, which means that the line would connect a significant proportion of households and workers, especially those in the lower-income ranges. The proposed stations would connect about 14,400 low-income workers (16.4 percent of all low-income workers) and 15,000 low income households (34.9 percent of all low-income households). These are some of the highest percentages among all of the transit lines analyzed for this report, making this an impressive line for a little city. The mayor of Madison was the first to seriously push for fixed-guideway transit in the region. His original vision was of a downtown streetcar, but tensions between the county executive?s plans for a regional rail line and the streetcar plan clashed and this project was the compromise. The line is currently in the engineering stage, and projected costs for this project are $255 million, for 16 miles of track, 18 stations and 11,000 projected daily riders (by 2030). Funding for the project has yet to be secured; discussions right now center on a sales tax measure (yet to be officially proposed) and New Starts funding from FTA.
Milwaukee WI Make existing jobs accessible by transit Colleges and universities are also at the forefront of offering public transportation circulators to and from campus from surrounding areas. Many regional transit agencies also offer discounted or free passes for students and university employees. Marquette University in Milwaukee?students get a free bus pass; LIMO service (Local Intercampus Mobile Operation) transports students to places within a small radius around campus between the hours of 5PM and 3AM (4AM on weekends). LIMO is student-run, with 12 vans in the fleet. They transport over 300,000 students per year, 6.6 million members of the Marquette community over 24 years.
Durham NC Offer access to a diversity of job opportunities The Research Triangle Park in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill region, home to 38,000 employees, has an Emergency Ride Home program for those who use an alternative mode of transportation to commute to work and end up working late or having an emergency situation. Employees must register for the program and are eligible if they ride the bus, vanpool, carpool, bike or walk to work). Emergency side trips, such as picking up a sick kid from daycare, are allowed. Employees can use this service up to twice a month but no more than six times a calendar year.
San Francisco CA Offer access to a diversity of job opportunities The Bay Area All Nighter is a joint service by five transit agencies in Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco, and San Mateo counties to provide afterhours services to most BART and Caltrain stations. It is funded with bridge toll money.
Aspen CO Offer access to a diversity of job opportunities In the Roaring Fork Valley region of Colorado, which includes Aspen, the local transit agency is planning the nation?s first bus rapid transit corridor to link Aspen with surrounding towns. Parking lots at transit stations would have potential to become TOD if communities desire to build it, and RFTA is already looking into joint development opportunities. RFTA estimates that new housing built within walking distance of transit could eliminate 4,639 car trips per day between the mountain communities in the RFV. The BRT vision is to ?significantly reduce dependence on oil through a resource efficient, climate friendly, multimodal transportation system with a regional express line unimpeded by traffic and weather, competitive with the private vehicle in terms of convenience, travel time, and quality.?
Vail CO Offer access to a diversity of job opportunities In Eagle County, home of the Vail ski resort, sales taxes were increased in the 1990s to pay for public transportation. Because the county receives so much revenue from ski tourism during the winter months, as well as other recreational activities in the summer, the town of Vail is able to offer free year-round bus service, the largest free transportation service in the nation. Eagle County still charges fares on regional routes to surrounding towns, however, and these are the places where most workers live, since Vail is so expensive.
Chicago IL Offer access to a diversity of job opportunities The Federal Transit Administration provides funding through the Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program to help communities provide public transportation during off-peak hours and unusual routes. Chicago has a Night Owl bus service on many routes that run 24 hours, 7 days a week. These routes are noted with an owl logo on city bus maps.
Chicago IL Offer access to a diversity of job opportunities The southern suburbs of Chicago are working on a strategy to increase transit service to industrial and manufacturing jobs, as well as provide more housing opportunities near existing train stations on the Metra commuter rail lines. The Southland Green TIME zone strategy aims to attract 13,000 new jobs and $2.3 billion in new income over ten years by focusing on both cargo- and transit-oriented development. , The project is led by the South Suburban Mayors and Managers Association (SSMMA), a collaboration of 42 municipalities in south suburban Chicago. The SSMMA was fortunate to receive two federal grants in late 2010 to implement this project: a $2.35 million HUD Community Challenge grant and an EPA Smart Growth Implementation Assistance grant to study ways to finance TOD infrastructure. These grants will help the SSMMA acquire and redevelop land near rail lines to build mixed-income TOD and improve access to new and future jobs in the region.
Indianapolis IN Offer access to a diversity of job opportunities The Federal Transit Administration provides funding through the Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program to help communities provide public transportation during off-peak hours and unusual routes. Indianapolis has a late-night bus service called IndyGo, which transports low-income workers between designated ?residential? and ?employer? zones. The ?residential? zones are among the lowest income neighborhoods in the city, while the ?employer? zones are typically industrial areas as well as the airport.
Monroe LA Offer access to a diversity of job opportunities The Federal Transit Administration provides funding through the Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program to help communities provide public transportation during off-peak hours and unusual routes. Monroe, Louisiana has a Night Rider service for late-night workers at retail outlets.
Newark NJ Offer access to a diversity of job opportunities The Federal Transit Administration provides funding through the Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program to help communities provide public transportation during off-peak hours and unusual routes. Essex County, New Jersey has night owl service to Newark Penn Station and surrounding neighborhoods. It is a demand-response service between 1AM to 5 AM for people working in New York City.
Laughlin NV Offer access to a diversity of job opportunities The Federal Transit Administration provides funding through the Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program to help communities provide public transportation during off-peak hours and unusual routes. The casino resort town of Laughlin, Nevada operates a 24-hour shuttle to and from major casinos, which helps workers get to and from their shifts, which often include late nights.
Buffalo NY Offer access to a diversity of job opportunities The Federal Transit Administration provides funding through the Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program to help communities provide public transportation during off-peak hours and unusual routes. The Niagara Frontier Transit Authority operates after-midnight service between Buffalo and suburban areas
New York NY Offer access to a diversity of job opportunities The Federal Transit Administration provides funding through the Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program to help communities provide public transportation during off-peak hours and unusual routes. New York City has a Request-A-Stop service allowing late-night riders to be let off at any location along a route in all five boroughs between 10 PM and 5 AM.
Portland OR Offer access to a diversity of job opportunities The Federal Transit Administration provides funding through the Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program to help communities provide public transportation during off-peak hours and unusual routes. Portland has a ?Swan Island Shuttle? providing afterhours services to FedEx and UPS facilities, as well as other industrial jobs on the island.
San Antonio TX Offer access to a diversity of job opportunities The Federal Transit Administration provides funding through the Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program to help communities provide public transportation during off-peak hours and unusual routes. San Antonio?s VIA Metropolitan Transit has extended service on many regular routes until 1:00 AM, reopening at 4:00 AM
National   Offer access to a diversity of job opportunities At the federal level, the Federal Transit Administration provides funding through the Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program to help communities provide public transportation during off-peak hours and unusual routes. The program targets welfare recipients and low-income workers who need transportation to and from work. Funding often goes to bus routes to suburban employment centers from inner-city neighborhoods with a high percentage of low-income households. It also helps these families transport their children to childcare facilities. Many of the jobs these people take are entry-level and low-skill, which often require late nights, second shifts, or weekends, when regular service is reduced or unavailable.
Tallahassee FL Provide the environments that retain and attract new regional talent and employers the economic competitiveness of a high quality of life. Tallahassee is the state capital of Florida and a college town, so it has a high number of government and education jobs, but it has trouble retaining talent, especially new graduates from Florida State University who leave for bigger cities upon graduation. KCCI awarded the region a five-year, $570,000 grant to begin the KCC Institute in 2007. The goal is to attract and retain young professionals and develop a more adaptable workforce. It is a community-driven model, with 30 hired ?Community Catalysts? that devote 4-5 hours per week for a year educating and engaging fellow citizens about sustainability and community prosperity.
Louisville KY Provide the environments that retain and attract new regional talent and employers the economic competitiveness of a high quality of life. The Louisville region has a talent retention initiative aimed at making the downtown a vibrant place that rivals other bigger cities that many young professionals flock to after graduation.
Lansing MI Provide the environments that retain and attract new regional talent and employers the economic competitiveness of a high quality of life. The State of Michigan has several initiatives aiming to attract and retain talent, including the Cool Cities Initiative and Michigan Future
Duluth MN Provide the environments that retain and attract new regional talent and employers the economic competitiveness of a high quality of life. In Duluth, Minnesota, a system with 31 ?Community Catalysts? was set up to develop initiatives to build on the four T?s of the ?creative class.? The group came up with five strategies: Brain gain, talent/tolerance initiative to recruit young talent to the area; Art Works, talent/territorial assets; Mix It Up, tolerance; Sustainable Twin Ports, technology; Pathways?territorial assets/talent
Bismarck ND Provide the environments that retain and attract new regional talent and employers the economic competitiveness of a high quality of life. North Dakota, which has maintained one of the lowest unemployment rates throughout the Great Recession, has a Talent Initiative aimed at increasing the incomes of North Dakotans through the attraction and retention of quality jobs.
Concord NH Provide the environments that retain and attract new regional talent and employers the economic competitiveness of a high quality of life. New Hampshire has a ?Stay Work Play? initiative to keep young graduates in the state after graduation. Its goal is to retain 55% of new and returning college graduates in the state, compared to the current 50%. The state has set up a website with social networking tools and employment opportunities to connect graduates to jobs and encourage employers to offer incentives to make staying in New Hampshire an attractive option over leaving for another state.
Cincinnati OH Provide the environments that retain and attract new regional talent and employers the economic competitiveness of a high quality of life. Cincinnati is stemming the ride of Midwest decline by investing in a downtown streetcar and other place-based initiatives to attract young professionals to the city. The greater Cincinnati region is home to at least nine Fortune 500 companies, and to retain these large employers, the City is trying to make itself more appealing to the types of employees these firms want to hire and retain. While the streetcar has lost political support and funding, it is still going ahead on a smaller scale. The City is also revitalizing the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood, a historic district downtown that sits between two of Cincinnati?s largest employment clusters, downtown and the University of Cincinnati. It has also redeveloped its waterfront with a large riverfront park, two new professional sports stadiums and a new multimodal transit center.
Memphis TN Provide the environments that retain and attract new regional talent and employers the economic competitiveness of a high quality of life. Memphis has a Smart City initiative to lure talented professionals to the city. The Columbus, Ohio Chamber of Commerce has set up social networking services with over sixty organizations to connect with young professionals. Lansing is attempting to retain Michigan State University graduates and keep them from moving to other states through a variety of efforts.
Nashville TN Provide the environments that retain and attract new regional talent and employers the economic competitiveness of a high quality of life. Nashville is seen by many planners as the next hot city, with its music culture, warm climate, and progressive thinking amidst a sea of Southern conservatism. The city has long been overshadowed by its larger neighbors, Atlanta and Charlotte, but now businesses are given the region another look. The Nashville Area MPO is hard at work on a regional transportation plan that would bring fixed-guideway public transportation to the region, as well as massively expand the trail system and on-street bike network to make walking and bicycling safer and more attractive. The vision is one of the boldest in the country with respect to its scale and transformative potential. In addition, Nashville has been able to transform its image from a country-music town into a broader music destination that crosses genres and offers numerous opportunities for entertainment. ?Music City USA? is often now termed ?Nashvegas? given the evolving nature of this city.

Reduce Auto Dependency / Vehicle-Related Emissions that…

  • Increase Transit Options
  • Increase Transit Usage
  • Make Walking and Biking Safe
  • Make Walking and Biking Accessible and Attractive
  • Reduce per-capita vehicle miles traveled
City State Category Description
Los Angeles CA Increase transit options Los Angeles 30/10 (America Fast Forward) ? In 2008 Los Angeles County voted to tax itself another half cent to pay for transportation improvements that would total over 40 billion dollars over 30 years. However, in order to reduce the cost of inflation and build transit faster, the county is looking for ways to borrow money that would allow them to build all of the 30 year plan in a 10 year period.
Pasadena CA Increase transit options Pasadena Streetcar Idea? Pasadena Water & Power: Utility fees can potentially offer capital and operating funding for the streetcar, and encourage ridership. One way to generate both funds and riders is to give rebates for transit riders on their power and water bills. The structure of the program could be similar to buying an energy star appliance or low flow toilet. Similar to a parking permit, Pasadena residents could receive a transit card that comes with their electric bill to show they pay for power within the city and thus get free transit. Another option is for the Pasadena Water & Power to operate the streetcar as a holding company. Since the repeal of the Public Utilities Holding Company Act in 2005, it has become possible for such an arrangement. The energy used by the streetcar could be obtained at a reduced rate or possibly without charge. Another option is for the City to charge a carbon fee through utility bills to pay for the capital or operating costs of the streetcar.
Denver CO Increase transit options Denver Transit Alliance Citizens? Academy ? This academy was put together to educate citizens and government officials about the benefits of transit and TOD. In turn these folks would go educate others around the region. It has been wildly successful at educating locals on how to engage in the debate and has no doubt had an impact on how Denver has moved forward with their expansion
Denver CO Increase transit options Denver?s Eagle P3 (public private partnership) is an example of how private companies can help transit agencies finance and build major capital projects. The basic idea is that it allows the transit agency to lower costs by spreading out the project costs over a longer period of time, as RTD puts it, kind of like a 30 year instead of a 15 year mortgage.
http://www.rtd-fastracks.com/main_126
Boston MA Increase transit options Fairmount Line Collaborative
http://www.swbcdc.org/Programs/fairmountindigoline.php
St. Louis MO Increase transit options Citizens for Modern Transit St. Louis ? Citizens for Modern Transit has been advocating transit expansion in the St. Louis region for over thirty years. Their most recent success came from organizing a diverse number of groups to support a recent sales tax to keep transit service from being cut.
Charlotte NC Increase transit options Charlotte: After passing a half cent sales tax that would pay for a regional bus and rail transportation network, Charlotte started construction on the first regional light rail line, which has been a success in ridership and connectivity. This has created the opportunity for expansion and plans are in the works for a streetcar and two more corridors soon.
Columbus OH Increase transit options Columbus Ohio looked at the possibility of an event ticket tax, where people who bought tickets to a sporting event or concert had to pay a fee that would support the streetcar, and they could use the streetcar with their tickets as a proof of payment system.
http://www.citybeat.com/cincinnati/article-4240-news-thats-the-ticket.html
Eugene OR Increase transit options Eugene BRT: Eugene built a short BRT line that is the basis for a whole network of which two lines have been constructed and another is in planning. Starting small and proving the concept has helped them move forward.
Pittsburgh PA Increase transit options CPEX
Houston TX Increase transit options Houston: After many years and many discussions whether to have a monorail or subway or even light rail, Houston Mayor Lee Brown pushed forward a simple light rail line that connected the largest medical center in the world with downtown Houston. They did it all with local money because Rep Tom Delay would not allow federal funding to be spent on the project. Today this is the most successful new line in the United States and construction has begun on future extensions that will bring the number of distinct lines to five.
Ogden UT Increase transit options Ogden Utah Streetcar
Small group of local activists pushed for an alignment that would serve the city?s existing streetcar suburbs and low income residents, in opposition to the current mayor. It was a political struggle and still in process
Seattle WA Increase transit options Value Capture Districts ? The capital cost for the South Lake Union Streetcar was half paid for by property owners along the corridor who saw it as a valuable asset. Most of the property however was owned by Paul Allen?s Vulcan Real Estate Firm. It was much easier to get everyone to approve when the majority owner approves. In addition, with the attraction of the Amazon.com headquarters in the district and more businesses coming in, now the businesses along the corridor have upped the ante and decided to chip in with more funding for operations of the line.
http://www.reconnectingamerica.org/assets/Uploads/2010gaovaluecapture.pdf
San Francisco CA Increase transit usage by making service reliable and frequent Google Transit: BART was one of the first agencies to release their real time feed to the public. By allowing outside app developers to make schedules they opened up new services.
Also used in rural communities. The FTA helped rural areas in Northern California figure out how to implement google transit at a smaller scale
http://www.reconnectingamerica.org/news-center/half-mile-circles/2009/helping-rural-residents-use-google-transit/
St. Louis MO Increase transit usage by making service reliable and frequent St. Louis passed a half cent sales tax in order to not cut service:
http://t4america.org/blog/2010/04/08/st-louis-county-approves-half-cent-sales-tax-for-public-transit/
Salt Lake City UT Increase transit usage by making service reliable and frequent Salt Lake City Fuel Surcharge - Allows the transit agency to raise rates on gas spikes such that price spikes that affect service are mitigated. ?The fuel surcharge is a fluctuating, temporary fee tied directly to the retail price of diesel fuel. When the average quarterly cost of diesel fuel, as reported by the DOE, goes below $3.00 per gallon, the fuel surcharge will be removed.?
http://www.rideuta.com/uploads/FuelSurchargeFAQFeb2011.pdf
San Rafael CA Make walking and biking safe, accessible, and attractive Federal Non-Motorized Transportation Pilot Program (NMTPP)
Written into the last federal transportation bill, SAFETEA-LU, was a pilot program for four communities to demonstrate the benefits of increasing walking and bicycling rates. One of the four communities selected was Marin County, CA (WalkBike Marin): http://www.walkbikemarin.org/
Minneapolis MN Make walking and biking safe, accessible, and attractive Federal Non-Motorized Transportation Pilot Program (NMTPP)
Written into the last federal transportation bill, SAFETEA-LU, was a pilot program for four communities to demonstrate the benefits of increasing walking and bicycling rates. One of the four communities selected was Minneapolis, MN (BikeWalk Twin Cities): http://www.bikewalktwincities.org/
Columbia MO Make walking and biking safe, accessible, and attractive Federal Non-Motorized Transportation Pilot Program (NMTPP)
Written into the last federal transportation bill, SAFETEA-LU, was a pilot program for four communities to demonstrate the benefits of increasing walking and bicycling rates. One of the four communities selected was Columbia, Missouri (GetABout Columbia) http://www.gocolumbiamo.com/PublicWorks/GetAboutColumbia/
Kirkland WA Make walking and biking safe, accessible, and attractive Kirkland, WA?s Active Transportation Plan : The City of Kirkland created a plan entitled More People, More Places, More Often, which focuses on goals such as reducing crash rates, increasing the number of children walking and bicycling to school, and removing physical barriers to walking and bicycling to make them more convenient modes of transportation.
Sheboygan WI Make walking and biking safe, accessible, and attractive Federal Non-Motorized Transportation Pilot Program (NMTPP) Written into the last federal transportation bill, SAFETEA-LU, was a pilot program for four communities to demonstrate the benefits of increasing walking and bicycling rates. One of the four communities selected was Sheboygan County, WI (NMTPP): http://www.co.sheboygan.wi.us/html/d_planning_nonmotorized_project.htm
San Francisco CA Manage parking San Francisco?s SF Park program is an innovative parking availability application that allows people to know where parking spaces are available and how much they cost. http://sfpark.org/about-the-project/
Denver CO Manage parking Denver Strategic Parking Plan: The City and County of Denver created a comprehensive plan for parking in 2010, recognizing that a one-size-fits-all approach was not an appropriate solution to managing parking issues around the entire city. The plan does not lay out new requirements or provide recommendations for specific neighborhoods, but rather it identifies strategies and tools that can be used to manage parking at the local level, depending on the neighborhood context. The Strategic Parking Plan is an outgrowth of other comprehensive planning efforts and the Plan?s tools provide a way to implement the goals of these plans and coordinate outcomes between other departmental initiatives. In creating this plan, the City?s Public Works and Commuting Planning & Development departments collected parking data from some of the City?s most popular neighborhoods to study demand and supply. They also studied whether demand and supply were related to the type of land use mixes across the different neighborhood types.
Minneapolis MN Manage parking The City of Minneapolis revised its off-street parking regulations in 2009 to be more flexible and context-sensitive. The City eliminated minimum parking requirements from downtown zoning districts and reduced them in many other zoning district. The new regulations make is easier to request a variance for reducing the number of parking spaces as well. It also increased bicycle parking requirements for most zoning districts.
Richmond VA Manage roadway capacity / connectivity The State of Virginia has enacted a policy that would require subdivisions to become more connected, reducing costs to emergency services such as fire and ambulance creating better response times due to greater connectivity.
http://greatergreaterwashington.org/post/1847/virginias-new-street-connectivity-regulations-the-specifics/

Support complete, vibrant communities that:

  • Provide access to healthy food
  • Promote physical activity
  • Provide access to arts, recreation, and entertainment
  • Make us happy
City State Category Description
North Little Rock AR Create communities that promote physical activity The City and school district are launching the Fit-2-Live Challenge, a community wellness program promoting policies that that encourage the adoption of healthy eating and healthy lifestyle behaviors. City agencies are working together to find ways to improve parks in underserved residential areas, build new trails and bike paths, and establish farmers? markets in underserved communities. Other participants include large employers, faith-based organizations, and healthcare organizations.
Tucson AZ Create communities that promote physical activity Activate Tucson : A collaboration of Tucson-area agencies and organizations, including the Pima County Health Department, have come together to ?get our community moving? through the Activate Tucson initiative. In addition to promoting physical activity and educating the community about nutrition, the organization hopes to become a clearinghouse for physical activity and nutrition information for the region.
San Diego CA Create communities that promote physical activity The Health and Human Services Agency will improve access to healthy food by establishing a food distribution center in San Diego to link local food demand with supply. It will also promote physical activity through community wellness programs and before/after school programs.
San Francisco CA Create communities that promote physical activity The Healthy Development Measurement Tool: thehdmt.org
The San Francisco Department of Health has developed a tool to measure health impacts in communities. The Healthy Development Measurement Tool analyzes how development affects social and physical environments important to health. The program was piloted in San Francisco and involved multiple stakeholders. The process took 18 months, with the following outcomes:
? A Healthy City Vision for San Francisco
? Community health objectives to reflect that vision
? Indicators to measure those objectives
? Data on those indicators to assess how the City was doing with respect to that vision,
? A menu of urban development policy strategies to advance those objectives.
? A summary of the health & equity impacts of urban development is available here: http://thehdmt.org/benefits.php

The HDMT was one of the first attempts to quantify health impacts from development in communities, and in San Francisco it has revealed major health disparities in lower-income neighborhoods. The average life expectancy in low-income areas of San Francisco was up to 28 years lower for men and 25 years for women compared to the highest income areas. The tool also provides evidence of the need for more affordable housing in the city, as the places with the most health benefits tend to be near transit stations and/or in walkable neighborhoods.

Communities around the nation are now using the HDMT to measure health impacts associated with development and infrastructure projects. The Denver Housing Authority utilized the HDMT as part of its redevelopment plan for a public housing site near a light rail station. The University of Texas Medical Branch conducted an HIA in Galveston to measure the health impacts of post-disaster recovery from Hurricane Ike. Humboldt County in Northern California is using the HDMT as part of its general plan update.
Miami FL Create communities that promote physical activity The Miami-Dade County Health Department will increase the availability of healthy foods and beverages by revising procurement policies and practices at schools, worksites, hospitals, and other community institutions. Miami-Dade hopes to reduce sodium consumption in Miami-Dade County through labeling initiatives and restaurant standards. These efforts will be complemented by a media campaign to promote healthy food and drink choices and increased physical activity. The department plans to enhance signage for bike lanes, boulevards, and walkable neighborhoods to encourage physical activity such as biking and walking. The Department will also work with child care facilities to increase the amount of physical activity.
Atlanta GA Create communities that promote physical activity The Atlanta region is preparing a regionwide Health Impact Assessments (HIA) as part of its general plan update for 2040. Georgia Tech?s Center for Quality Growth and Regional Development (CQGRD) is leading the assessment. It hopes to answer the following questions:
? Will regional growth promote safe, livable, affordable communities with a stable economic base?
? Will it allow metro Atlanta residents to choose healthy, active lifestyles?
? How will it affect everyday activities like going to work, to school, or to the store?
Maui HI Create communities that promote physical activity Both Kauai and Maui have launched broad physical activity and nutrition programs to educate Hawaiian residents about the benefits of walking, biking, and using public transportation, as well as making healthy food choices at grocery stores and restaurants.
Wichita KS Create communities that promote physical activity The Health and Wellness Coalition of Wichita has been working since 2003 to promote physical activity in Wichita. Recently it has been a major advocate of improvements to the built environment in the revitalization of downtown, including complete streets concepts, bike racks on city buses, etc.
Louisville KY Create communities that promote physical activity The City of Louisville, Kentucky is taking steps to reduce its obesity rate through improvements to the built environment, such as building new sidewalks, bicycle lanes, and pocket parks around the city, but especially in low-income neighborhoods with some of the highest obesity rates in the nation. Recent estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention classify six out of every 10 Louisville residents as obese, which caught the attention of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which has provided generous grant support to the city to implement programs and policies that will reduce this epidemic. In addition to building new infrastructure, the city has also worked with local convenience stores to offer healthier food choices, educated church groups on healthier food options, and set up community gardens. The City has also set up an education program on obesity with a grant from former Mayor Jerry Abramson, called the Healthy Hometown Movement. Abramson told the New York Times that the City?s obesity rate was making it unattractive to businesses who would have to pay higher health care costs for Louisville workers: ?For businesses, a healthy work force is more productive and less costly, so it became a competitiveness issue,? Mr. Abramson said. ?Every city was offering tax incentives, every city was offering real estate deals but not every city had the weight problem we do.? Some neighborhoods have seen great success with the new initiatives, while others have not seen any major changes, mostly due to low community support.
Boston MA Create communities that promote physical activity The Healthy Transportation Compact, signed into law in June 2009, requires that all transportation decisions consider public health outcomes, including active transportation modes such as walking and bicycling. The Governor has set up a joint task force between the departments of Transportation, Health & Human Services, Energy & Environmental Affairs, MassDOT Highway Administration, MassDOT Transit Administration, and the Commission of Public Health, to oversee the implementation of this law. In addition to promoting inter-agency collaboration, the compact will also help the state reduce GHG emissions, increase active transportation, increase the use of health impact assessments in transportation projects, expand Safe Routes to Schools, develop public-private partnerships in furtherance of the compact goals, and develop as set of metrics and outcomes for evaluating progress toward concrete goals. In January 2011, the Federal Highway Administration awarded MassDOT with its 2010 Exemplary Human Environment Initiative Award for this groundbreaking collaboration.
Portland ME Create communities that promote physical activity Power Up Portland is a healthy eating active living program (HEAL) with the following components:
? Farm-to-school food systems
? Sponsoring a public education campaign to promote healthy foods and beverages;
? Providing support for required daily structured physical activity in after-school/child care settings;
? Taking actions designed to increase the number of safe, attractive, and accessible places for activity;
? Increasing physical activity opportunities and signage in walkable/mixed-use neighborhoods and public transportation (e.g., through bike lanes/boulevards); Facilitating increased use of parks and facilities through subsidization of membership;
Facilitating increased physical activity through Safe Routes to School programs.
Vicksburg MS Create communities that promote physical activity A local woman (Linda Fondren) started a community walking club to help community members lose weight and learn how to exercise. Over 2/3 of Vicksburg residents (pop. 26,000) are overweight or obese and Linda's sister died from an obesity-related disease. Linda started by opening a gym called Shape Up Sisters in 2006, offering free nutrition and workout classes. She then turned it into Shape Up Vicksburg, a 17-week weight loss challenge. She got the town's mayor, police officer, and various other important public officials to join in. In the first four months, the town collectively lost 15,000 pounds. The program has brought people out into the community and brought increased attention to the built environment and how it deters walking, bicycling, and public transportation trips in this small community.
Omaha NE Create communities that promote physical activity The Douglas County Health Department and Live Well Omaha community partnership have a healthy eating active living (HEAL) plan focused on improving signage at parks and trails, expanding Safe Routes to School, and improving access to healthy food through the Healthy Stores program.
Albuquerque NM Create communities that promote physical activity Prescription Trails is a program that helps identify walking and wheelchair-accessible routes for people across New Mexico, including local programs in Albuquerque, Las Cruces, and Santa Fe. The program is run by the New Mexico Health Care Takes on Diabetes coalition, a group of 30 health care organizations.
Oklahoma City OK Create communities that promote physical activity Mayor Mick Cornett has made tackling the obesity epidemic one of this top priorities, and one of his strategies for slimming down the city is to improve the built environment by constructing new sidewalks, jogging & biking trails, and parks. The Mayor set a goal in 2008 of the city losing one million pounds. Called OKC Million, the City set up a website, ?thiscityisgoingonadiet.com,? to track the City?s progress toward this goal, and has lined up major corporate sponsors from the community to contribute. As of April 2011, the City had made it halfway toward its goal, with over 40,000 people losing 519,000 pounds. The Mayor saw his City?s high obesity ranking as a potential deterrent for companies seeking to do business there. As he told Next American City, ?[I]f I?m a job creator, and I see Oklahoma City on the list of the most obese cities in the country, I?ve got to think: What are my health care costs going to be? What?s my absenteeism rate going to be? Why would I create jobs in a city that doesn?t value health??

The City also recently adopted a downtown revitalization plan that makes active and public transportation top priorities. Voters even approved a one-cent sales tax increase in 2009 to fund these improvements. The $777 million ?Metropolitan Area Projects? (MAPS3) includes funding for improved street designs, as well as seed funding for a streetcar line. Cornett was named a 2010 Public Official of the Year by Governing magazine. In an interview with the magazine, the Mayor stated how the built environment had led to Oklahoma City becoming one of the most obese cities in America:

?So I started losing weight, and in the process of losing this weight, I spent a great deal of time trying to decide why the city had developed into one of the most obese cities -- it was that automobile-centric culture, it was that fast-food mentality. It was the fact that we hadn't built a pedestrian-friendly community. People drove everywhere.?
Philadelphia PA Create communities that promote physical activity uGo Community Wellness

Program Two friends in Philadelphia created uGo, a community revitalization initiative in West Philadelphia centered around physical activity, with the primary goal of making people feel safe exercising in their neighborhood. In its first year in 2010, uGo recruited 150 participants from 50 families of all ages. They paired these participants with volunteer health professionals, including doctors, nurses, nutritionists, and fitness trainers, to assess their physical health and make suggestions to improve their wellness. These volunteers offers group fitness classes, health screenings, nutrition workshops, and other events to promote physical activity and educate participants about ways to be and stay healthy. At the end of 11 weeks, uGo held a 5K run/walk event to assess their improvements and create a community event. The friends got the idea after running in a 5K through another neighborhood and seeing how enthusiastic community members were in cheering on race participants. They felt that a race would be a good way to showcase West Philadelphia and make people proud of their neighborhood. In 2011, uGo expanded to several other neighborhoods in Philadelphia.

According to the founders, uGo became popular due to its ?family feel? and ?consistent support and accountability.? Neighborhood residents who were reluctant to exercise outside now had a group to join that would hold them accountable and make exercising a community event.

Students Run Philly

Philadelphia also has a marathon training program for youth, similar to a program in Los Angeles, that aims to improve academic, safety, and health outcomes through an exercise program. With over half of Philadelphia?s children overweight, the program pairs children with adult mentors who teach them how to exercise and stay committed to a routine. It also helps the children stay out of trouble and avoid violent situations. The program also offers test prep courses and college admissions workshops.

In 2009, the program enrolled 500 students and 150 mentors. In the first year, the group ran in an organize road race called the Broad Street Run, with 175 students and 80 members finishing the 10-mile course. In 2010, Students Run Philly Style organized its own event, the Gener8tion Run, a shorter 8K run/walk event. It was run again in April 2011
Nashville TN Create communities that promote physical activity Health departments are becoming increasingly involved in transportation planning. In Nashville, the MPO has incorporated public health into its regional transportation plan (LRTP), highlighting the importance of transportation options to regional health and quality of life. The LRTP includes long-term plans for a bicycle network and transit network, which while idealistic and visionary at this point, lay the groundwork for the region to improve its health outcomes through the built environment. Approximately 70% of roadway projects must include sidewalks, bicycle lanes, or other improvements to promote active transportation, up from 2% in the last LRTP. The LRTP also makes $2.5 million available for active transportation infrastructure in just the next several years. The MPO also conducted a regionwide bicycle and pedestrian study in 2009 to inventory sidewalks and bicycle facilities and gather community input on where the greatest needs for investment were. This document helped planners identify projects for the LRTP. A health impact assessment also revealed a strong link between lack of physical activity and chronic disease rates in the region. Rates were much higher in neighborhoods with higher proportions of low income, minority, and older adult populations.
San Antonio TX Create communities that promote physical activity The Metropolitan Health District is working with school districts to open up their recreational facilities for after-hours use for physical activity. It is also working to implement the City?s complete streets policy and encourage development projects that are pedestrian-friendly.
Seattle WA Create communities that promote physical activity The King County Department of Public Health is working to improve health outcomes in the Seattle region through a number of different food access and physical activity programs. King County is working with cities to incorporate active transportation into all planning documents.
Los Angeles CA Every child has access to a quality education Local Investment in Childcare: ? Los Angeles: Metro Hollywood Transit Village?an $80 million mixed-use TOD with 120 apartments, office & retail, and a 9,000 s.f. childcare center for 52 children. The project was built by Hollywood Community Housing Corporation with assistance from the LA County Metropolitan Transportation authority and the City of LA Redevelopment Agency. The nonprofit Assistance League of Southern California operates the child care center. Tuition is subsidized at 40-50% below market rate.
Oakland CA Every child has access to a quality education Lake Merritt (Oakland) BART Station Area Plan?the station area includes an elementary school, three charter schools, a high school, and a community college. Lincoln Elementary School is one of the highest-performing in the district and near the station. It is one of the few schools in the district experiencing increases in enrollment. The school has a joint-use agreement with an adjacent city-owned recreation center to share facilities for recess and after-school activities. Three charter schools are also within the station area, but unlike Lincoln students, most students at these schools do not reside in the neighborhood. MetWest High School is a small public high school with 131 students and a focus on experiential learning and internships. Laney College sits on 60 acres, and was a leading stakeholder in the planning process. Getting input from these schools and the families attending them was difficult, but provided valuable input into the planning process. The City was able to include housing and other land use recommendations based on what they heard and the types of people attending these schools.
Oakland CA Every child has access to a quality education Local Investment in Childcare: ? Fruitvale Transit Village has a 24,000 s.f. child care center, in addition to 47 apartments and 20 retail spaces. The child care center is a Head Start facility with 120 child care spots. More than 50% of families walk to the center, and there are five curbside drop-off and pick-up parking spaces adjacent to the entrance. There is a second-floor playground due to space constraints. The City of Oakland paid the lease for the child care center?s first 20 years of operation, recognizing that this center would provide a needed service to the community. The center currently has a waiting list because it can only service 120 children at a time.
San Diego CA Every child has access to a quality education Local Investment in Childcare: San Diego County is requiring mitigation or incentives to encourage developers to include child care facilities in new developments.
San Francisco CA Every child has access to a quality education Local Investment in Childcare: BART provides for child care in their planning documents.
San Francisco CA Every child has access to a quality education San Francisco?s Y-Plan (Youth-Plan, Learn, Act, Now)?a youth civic engagement program that uses urban space slated for redevelopment as a catalyst for community revitalization and education reform. Over the past decade, Y-PLAN has engaged over 1,000 youth in over 50 local planning projects
San Jose CA Every child has access to a quality education Childcare at Transit Hubs: San Jose VTA?Tamien Child Care Center, operated by Bright Horizons, sits at a light rail station and enrolls 150 children. http://www.vta.org/services/child_care.html
San Jose CA Every child has access to a quality education Local Investment in Childcare: San Jose?s Ohlone-Chynoweth Commons development, with 194 units at a busy light rail station
San Jose CA Every child has access to a quality education San Jose Diridon Station Area Planning Process?there are no schools in this station area but it is planned to be a major node in the future high-speed rail system. The plan addresses the need for schools and housing that fits the needs of future resident
San Leandro CA Every child has access to a quality education Local Investment in Childcare: San Leandro, CA intends to award incentives to developers who include childcare facilities in projects that meet a certain size threshold
Valleyo CA Every child has access to a quality education Local Investment in Childcare: Vallejo?s Sereno Transit Village?125 housing units with a child care center and a community center
Watsonville CA Every child has access to a quality education Local Investment in Childcare: Watsonville, CA?Via del Mar is a 40-unit high-density development at a major transit center with a child care facility for 32 children. The City had to approve a special use permit to build the center but it felt it was a high priority for a city with a large youth population. The transit agency helped fund the center through a land lease of $1/year. GoKids, Inc. operates the center. The playground is available to TOD residents during off hours.
Atlanta GA Every child has access to a quality education Atlanta, GA Eastlake Community ? A neighborhood plan that included new mixed-income housing, new charter school, and new youth services at the local YMCA.
New Orleans LA Every child has access to a quality education NOLA- Lagniappe Project ? comprehensive plan focused on developing a new charter school, community health center, and other neighborhood services
Annapolis MD Every child has access to a quality education The State of Maryland has a Moderately Priced Dwelling Unit (MPDU) zoning requirement that requires developments with over 50 units to include affordable housing. Developers get a density bonus in return.
Baltimore MD Every child has access to a quality education Baltimore EBDI Plan ? Incorporated new school and admissions qualifications into neighborhood plan.
Baltimore MD Every child has access to a quality education Baltimore, Maryland's "Diploma Plus" program presents drop-outs and youth at risk of dropping out with a set of challenging experiences including community-based projects, internships, and college classes.
Baltimore MD Every child has access to a quality education Baltimore: MTA Buses Students?MTA has a contract with Baltimore City Public Schools to provide no-cost bus service to eligible middle & high school students. The public school district pays for the service, and estimates it costs less than using & maintaining its own school busses. Between 25,000-28,000 students use the program. http://planning.maryland.gov/pdf/ourproducts/publications/modelsguidelines/mg27.pdf
Gaithersburg MD Every child has access to a quality education Local Investment in Childcare: Maryland?s Shady Grove Metro Station?public-private partnership with 11 corporate sponsors, includes a child care center
Gaithersburg MD Every child has access to a quality education The Montgomery County School District is the largest in the state and the 16th largest in the U.S. It is also one of the best performing in the nation. The County considers adequate space in schools when approving new developments as part of the its growth management policy.
Rockville MD Every child has access to a quality education Montgomery County, MD: Uses inclusionary zoning to create more affordable housing in neighborhoods with good schools
Minneapolis MN Every child has access to a quality education The City of Minneapolis is grappling with the schools issue as an increasing number of families with small children moves into revitalized neighborhoods in the City?s core. According to the Star Tribune, the number of children under 5 years old has tripled since the year 2000 in several neighborhoods downtown (Mill District, Warehouse District, etc.). There are no elementary schools nearby but there is one private high school within walking distance. City planners and education officials are becoming concerned about how to connect these families with good schools in order to keep young families in the downtown neighborhoods. http://www.startribune.com/local/minneapolis/125692778.html
Kansas City MO Every child has access to a quality education Childcare at Transit Hubs: Kansas City?s 39th & Troost Development includes a 5,100 s.f. childcare facility for children 6 weeks to 5 y.o. http://www.kcata.org/rider_guide/metrocenters/. The YMCA runs it.
Kansas City MO Every child has access to a quality education Local Investment in Childcare: Kansas City?s Metro Center Transfer Point (39th & Troost) contains a child care center built as part of a public-private partnership with the KCMC Child Development Corporation. The Metro Early Learning Center has room for 100 children ages 6 weeks to 5 years old. It operates a full-day Head Start program as well. The FTA partially funded the child care facility?it contributed $2.2 million to build the exterior shell (the local transit agency added $560,000). KCMC CDC then paid $656,000 for the interior improvements. The facility is credited with revitalizing the surrounding neighborhood and increasing ridership in the transit system.
Rochester NY Every child has access to a quality education Rochester, NY: Regional Transit Provider Buses Students?local businesses and school districts subsidize public transportation service for schoolchildren, saving the school districts money. http://www.rgrta.com/pdf/33207_RGRTA.pdf??
Cincinnati OH Every child has access to a quality education Cincinnati, OH-?Students Roadmap to Success? ? Regional university and city collaboration identifies resources and needs to encourage successful educational outcomes for residents.
Cleveland OH Every child has access to a quality education Childcare at Transit Hubs: ? Cleveland?s Louis Stokes Rapid Transit Station?the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority formed a public-private partnership to help build a Head Start Child Care Center for participants in the Welfare-to-Work program. It also entered into a joint development project with the Council for Economic Opportunities of Greater Cleveland to build a connecting walkway between the child care center and the transit station. http://www.fta.dot.gov/documents/051112a_Revised_NCNW_brochure.pdf
Columbus OH Every child has access to a quality education Childcare at Transit Hubs: Columbus, OH?s South Linden Transit Center includes a daycare center and children?s health clinic, among other services. It is open 24 hours to assist parents who work nontraditional hours. The center was built as part of a public-private partnership between the Central Ohio Transit Authority, Urban Growth Corporation, and community leaders. http://www.fta.dot.gov/documents/051112a_Revised_NCNW_brochure.pdf
Portland OR Every child has access to a quality education Multnomah County, OR: SUN Community Schools?transforms schools into full-service community centers, providing social, health & support services to 21,000 students and an additional 71,000 residents in the Portland region, with a goal of promoting educational success and self-sufficiency. http://web.multco.us/sun
Portland OR Every child has access to a quality education Portland (Oregon) Community College (PCC) Prep Alternative Programs are offered to youth who have left high school before graduating and need support to help them successfully complete their GED and explore future academic opportunities. "Youth Empowered to Succeed" (YES) offers a series of career development and college success classes and offers college credit for each term the youth is enrolled in the GED classes
Portland OR Every child has access to a quality education Portland, OR?s Youth Planning Program: The Bureau of Planning & Sustainability hires young people to work with city planners to create a long-range vision for the region. The youth are given small grants to create community-based projects that help make the city?s plan, ?Our Bill of Rights: Children + Youth,? a reality. One recent project was the Eastside MAX Station Communities Project, which looked at the half-mile radius around transit stations and surveyed young people about their concerns and priorities for change.
http://www.portlandonline.com/bps/index.cfm?c=50268??
Portland OR Every child has access to a quality education Portland YouthPass: The Portland Public School District provided free transit passes for all middle and high school students on free/reduced-lunch programs. The district saves approximately $800,000 per year by relying on public transportation instead of its own fleet of yellow school buses. Over 2,500 low-income students participate in the program. There have been plans to create permanent YouthPass program for all 13,000 high school students by using funding from the City?s Business Energy Tax Credit program, but the state legislature is considering cutting that program.
Richmond VA Every child has access to a quality education Virginia has developed "Middle College", a pilot program offered at two community college sites, designed to reach youth between the ages of 18 and 24, who need a GED. Youth enroll in a variety of quality, proven courses that enhance basic workforce skills through project-based learning, provide remedial courses as necessary, and allow them to accumulate community college credits towards a degree or certificate.
Stevens Point WI Every child has access to a quality education Stevens Point, WI: Freedom Pass: This small Wisconsin town is offering elementary through high school students with a $20 transit pass, called the Freedom Pass, to ride city buses all summer long.
National   Every child has access to a quality education ? EPA School Siting Guidelines: http://www.epa.gov/schools/siting/
The EPA is in the process of revising its guidelines for the location selection of new schools. Previously, there were minimum acreage requirements for schools, which led many communities to build new schools on the outer edges where land was available. This has led to decreases rates of walking and bicycling to school, as most new schools end up in auto-oriented areas with heavy traffic and poor connectivity to surrounding neighborhoods. The new draft guidelines (issued in February 2011) include site selection criteria that emphasizes livability and sustainability:
Chicago IL Every citizen has access to healthy and affordable food, bank services Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel: Eliminate Food Deserts in the City : Newly elected Mayor of Chicago, Rahm Emanuel, has made it a goal of his administration to eliminate food deserts in six Chicago neighborhoods, where a total of 450,000 (some stories say 600,000) residents have limited access too fresh food. Emanuel held a ?Food Desert Summit? in June 2011 where he met with local grocery store chains to discuss obstacles and concerns. The Mayor wants all low-income neighborhoods to be within a one-mile walk of a grocery store selling fresh fruits and vegetables and other fresh items. Walmart is aiming to fill the food desert void in many Chicago neighborhoods with new smaller, urban-scale stores. This move has been highly controversial, however.
Chicago IL Every citizen has access to healthy and affordable food, bank services Fresh Moves bus: In the City of Chicago, three friends came up with the idea to start a mobile grocery store that would travel around the city with fresh produce, bringing healthy food directly to communities that lacked access to healthier items in their neighborhood. The local transit agency (CTA) donated a bus and Architecture for Humanity helped them turn the bus into a grocery store. The bus, called ?Fresh Moves,? started service in May 2011, and within its first five days it had served over 600 customers. Project manager Dara Cooper told The Huffington Post, ?The first day, it was pouring raining, and we sold out of organic collard greens the first hour?We sold out of mangoes, cherry tomatoes, it was amazing." The success of the bus helps debunk the theory that low-income people don?t want fresh produce, and instead prefer fast food and junk food. "We're proving that unfounded theory wrong," Sheelah Muhammad, board secretary for Fresh Moves, said. "There's a huge demand for this. They're tired of the fast food, they're tired of the lack of options." Right now the bus only provides service two days a week to two neighborhoods on Chicago?s west side, but there are plans for expansion. The cofounders envision a day when the Fresh Moves bus is as ubiquitous as the ice cream truck. "Everyone remembers the music, they hear it and they know ice cream is there. When they see our bus, we want them to know fresh fruits and vegetables are here," Steven Casey, board president and cofounder, stated to the Chicago Tribune.
New Orleans LA Every citizen has access to healthy and affordable food, bank services The food desert problem became especially dire in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Studies by Tulane University and Social Compact found that only 30 full-service grocers reopened in the city by 2010, and that nearly 60% of low-income residents, only 58% of whom owned a car, had to drive more than three miles to reach a supermarket. The City established a Fresh Food Retailer Initiative in early 2011 to provide low-interest, forgivable loans to supermarkets and grocery stores located in or planning to locate in underserved New Orleans neighborhoods. The program has $14 million available to help open, renovate, or expand retail outlets selling fresh produce. The funds come from a combination of Community Development Block Grants, a local match from Hope Enterprise Corporation, and the Food Trust. In a press release, Mayor Mitch Landrieu stated, ?For too long, our citizens have lacked access to fresh, healthy foods?I am excited to finally make this program a reality, particularly for the quality of life in underserved neighborhoods, and to foster healthy lifestyle habits for all of our citizens.?
Baltimore MD Every citizen has access to healthy and affordable food, bank services Baltimarket: The City of Baltimore Public Library set up a ?virtual supermarket? called ?Baltimarket,? whereby residents from three food deserts can order their food online at no extra charge from a full-service supermarket, and once a week it is delivered to the local library. The City pays the delivery costs, with generous support from the Walmart Foundation ($100,000) and United Way ($55,250). Delivery to the local neighborhoods could run between $15-20 per delivery, and the supermarkets have safety concerns about making deliveries to certain neighborhoods, so by delivering to the library, they alleviate those concerns. There are around 85 regular users of the service, with hopes to attract at least 200 customers making 1,000 orders a year.
Detroit MI Every citizen has access to healthy and affordable food, bank services Green Grocer Project : A program providing financial incentives for grocers who open stores within the City of Detroit?s boundaries. Stores must sell ?significant merchandise? from the following categories: produce, meat, dairy, baked goods, and grocery items. The goal of the project is to ?stimulate renewed investment in Detroit neighborhoods while providing improved fresh food access to Detroit residents.?
Minneapolis MN Every citizen has access to healthy and affordable food, bank services ? Healthy Corner Store Program
o 6-month pilot program to help Minneapolis retailers in underserved areas sell fresh produce.
o 10 pilot retailers
o Specialty wholesaler supplies produce-handling training
o Store operations manager works with retailers to manage pricing and margins
o Lowry Food Market in North Minneapolis, a small convenience store in a low-income neighborhood, began selling fresh fruits and vegetables out of a repurposed soda cooler. The store also began laying out healthy foods on tables to suggest dinner options.
o Still very expensive to offer produce?one retailer estimates he moves $400 in chips per week vs. $60 in produce
o Helps meet WIC certification
Columbus OH Every citizen has access to healthy and affordable food, bank services The Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission received a $864,989 HUD Community Challenge grant to start a Fresh Food Access Initiative, that will develop a variety of programs to integrate the local food system into the Columbus metro region. These projects include new community gardens, a neighborhood food campus to teach classes in food production, transportation planning around food access, and a "healthy food team."

The United Way of Central Ohio has also partnered with several other organizations to form a Healthy Corner Store Initiative, which will help local convenience stores in the Franklinton neighborhood of Columbus sell fresh produce, as well as redesign displays and enhance inventories to promote healthier food options. The collaboration includes Ohio State University?s Center for Farmland Policy Innovation, Columbus Public Health, and Local Matters. A local community organization called Franklinton Gardens works directly with store owners and residents to educate them about healthy food choices.
Harrisburg PA Every citizen has access to healthy and affordable food, bank services One of the largest success stories is the State of Pennsylvania?s Fresh Food Financing Initiative, a public-private partnership designed to expand access to full-service grocery stores and healthy food choices for Pennsylvania residents. The impetus was a national study that found that the City of Philadelphia had the second lowest number of supermarkets per capita of major cities in the US. Today the Reinvestment Fund, Food Trust, and Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs Coalition jointly manage the $120 million grant program. Since its founding, the FFFI has helped build 88 new grocery stores in 34 counties, creating or preserving over 5,000 jobs in the process. Over 500,000 people now have improved access to food as a result of this initiative. In Philadelphia alone, the program helped to open 26 supermarkets, guided 130% increase in food stamp redemption at farmers? markets, and signed up 500 corner stores in a Healthy Corner Store Initiative (cash incentive to sell produce and coolers for storage).
Spartanburg SC Every citizen has access to healthy and affordable food, bank services Local nonprofits in Spartanburg have helped the city provide healthier food options. The Hub City farmer?s Market started 40 community vegetable gardens and two weekly farmers? markets, which attract over 650 customers and 30 farmers. Along with the Mary Black Foundation , it has also funded a mobile food truck, converted from an old ice cream truck, that sells fresh fruits and vegetables in low-income neighborhoods twice a week.
National   Every citizen has access to healthy and affordable food, bank services The success of the Pennsylvania program has led other states to experiment with similar programs, and even the federal government has proposed a national fresh food financing initiative, with the goal of eliminating all food deserts in the entire United States within the next seven years. The initiative is a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Treasury Department, and Health and Human Services. Assistance will include federal tax credits, below-market-rate loans, loan guarantees, and grants to attract private-sector capital. Eligible projects include consumer education initiatives, store construction & expansion, and rural cooperatives.
San Francisco CA Neighborhoods are safe and accessible to all people TransForm and the East Bay Bicycle Coalition has $20 million available in grant money to improve walking and bicycling to regional transit. To date, over $12 million has been awarded for over 30 projects. http://transformca.org/campaign/sr2t
Washington DC Neighborhoods are safe and accessible to all people CVS/pharmacy has established a partnership with the District of Columbia Department of Employment Services (DOES). As a result of this partnership, DOES has created a Regional One-Stop Employment Center co-located within a fully functional corporate learning center. This project has been replicated in several other key markets, such as, Atlanta, Baltimore, New York City, and Detroit. Youth from the Youth Opportunity Grant sites in the District of Columbia and Detroit have gone through the career training offered through this partnership.
Trenton NJ Neighborhoods are safe and accessible to all people The State of New Jersey has a Safe Streets to Transit program that funds projects that improve access to transit facilities and all nodes of public transportation. The programs goals are to:
o To improve the overall safety and accessibility for mass transit riders walking to transit facilities.
o To encourage mass transit users to walk to transit stations.
o To facilitate the implementation of projects and activities that will improve safety in the vicinity of transit facilities (approximately one-half mile for pedestrian improvements).
New York NY Neighborhoods are safe and accessible to all people The New York City Department of Transportation has created a Safe Routes to Transit program to improve the pedestrian experience near subway and bus stations. The program is broken down into three categories: (1) bus stops under elevated railways, (2) subway/sidewalk interface, and (3) sidewalks to buses. In all cases, the DOT will make capital investments in street, sidewalk and crosswalk design to improve safety. Before/after images of completed projects here: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/html/sidewalks/safertstransit.shtml
Harrisburg PA Neighborhoods are safe and accessible to all people Improving Public Safety Through TOD (Philadelphia) : The State of Pennsylvania?s Department of Community & Economic Development hired Interface Studio to research how strategic investment in TOD can improve public safety. Interface collected case studies and conducted a review of literature on TOD & public safety, and also analyzed local crime trends in Philadelphia, with a focus on five SEPTA station areas. The analysis discovered that 25% of all crimes in the City occurred within 1/4-mile of a rail station.
National   Neighborhoods are safe and accessible to all people Building School District-Based Strategies For Reducing Youth Involvement In Gangs And Violent Crime Through A Workforce Development Approach: In 2007, The U.S. Department of Labor awarded five School Districts $4.8 million to develop strategies for reducing youth involvement in gangs using a workforce development approach. The school districts Baltimore, Philadelphia, Chicago, Milwaukee, and Orange County, Florida were the five district recipients of this grant.
National   Neighborhoods are safe and accessible to all people The Department of Labor has administered the YouthBuild program since September 2006. YouthBuild provides job training and educational opportunities for at-risk youth ages 16-24 while constructing or rehabilitating affordable housing for low-income or homeless families in their own neighborhoods. Youth split their time between the construction site and the classroom, where they earn their GED or high school diploma, learn to be community leaders, and prepare for college and other postsecondary training opportunities.
San Francisco CA Celebrate cultural heritage of the community and its residents Retail corridors also help us preserve our heritage and play a key role in preventing displacement. In San Francisco, Japantown Better Neighborhood Plan: http://www.sf-planning.org/index.aspx?page=1692
Denver CO Celebrate cultural heritage of the community and its residents Retail corridors also help us preserve our heritage and play a key role in preventing displacement. In Devenver, CO, there is the Five Points: Sustainable Main Streets Initiative: http://dola.colorado.gov/sustainability/sustainable-main-streets.html and Welton Street Marketplace Revitalization Plan: http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_16688201
Honolulu HI Celebrate cultural heritage of the community and its residents Retail corridors also help us preserve our heritage and play a key role in preventing displacement. In Hawaii, the Honolulu Cultural Heritage Corridor: http://www.carolfukunaga.com/Neighborhoods/honolulu-cultural-heritage-corridor-report-review-for-community.html
Somerville MA Create places that make us happy ? Gallup began publishing a Well-Being Index in 2008 to measure national well-being, which measures various dimensions of well-being and breaks the results down by geography. Gallup and the Knight Foundation have also conducted a ?Soul of the Community? survey that asked 43,000 Americans in 26 U.S. cities what they identify most strongly with their communities. Somerville, Massachusetts has added a happiness question to its city census forms. On a scale from 1 to 10, people are asked ?How happy do you feel right now?? The city wants to become the first U.S. city to systematically track people?s happiness, according to a recent New York Times article. The article mentions how other countries have been measuring happiness for years, but that the U.S. traditionally just measures success using economic indicators like GDP, which inevitably just measure material well-being. City officials hope the survey helps them provide better services and amenities to the community, including infrastructure. They want to know how people feel about parks, bike paths, public transportation, affordable housing, and other issues that affect quality of life.
Seattle WA Create places that make us happy Gallup began publishing a Well-Being Index in 2008 to measure national well-being, which measures various dimensions of well-being and breaks the results down by geography. Gallup and the Knight Foundation have also conducted a ?Soul of the Community? survey that asked 43,000 Americans in 26 U.S. cities what they identify most strongly with their communities. Sustainable Seattle, a regional sustainability organization, has a Happiness Initiative that it hopes to spread to other cities across the U.S. The Happiness Initiative began in 1991 as an alternative to using GDP to measure well-being. For its 20th anniversary in 2011, Sustainable Seattle published its first set of happiness indicators to use in measuring community well-being. These indicators include poverty rate, air emissions, voter turnout, volunteer rates, life expectancy, commute time, work time, and graduation rates. The group adapted the measure from the country of Bhutan, which surveys its citizens for their happiness on nine key dimensions: environment & nature, good government, material well-being, psychological well-being, physical health, time or work-life balance, social vitality and connection, education, and arts & culture. The survey is now available on the organzation?s website for anyone to take, regardless of location. Sustainable Seattle is promoting the first National Pursuit of Happiness Day for April 13, 2012.
Little Rock AR Improve local access to shopping, services and other amenities Since the River Rock Streetcar opened in 2004, it has been credited with helping to make the downtown retail and restaurant trade pop in Little Rock, AR. The streetcar has helped make the River Market District the city?s leading cultural, entertainment and retail neighborhood. Based in part on the success of the Little Rock streetcar, other cities are exploring how streetcars and trolleys could increase retail patronage, investment and visibility.
Louisville KY Improve local access to shopping, services and other amenities The Louisville Downtown Development Corporation is focusing a great deal of attention on improving the quantity and quality of retail in the heart of the city. The LDDC conducted a retail study in 2011 and, based on its findings, has decided to create a new downtown retail district along South Fourth Street between Muhammad Ali Boulevard and Broadway. The LDDC has invested in the corridor and is marketing it as a place for unique, destination retail centered on fashion, the arts, and design.
Baltimore MD Improve local access to shopping, services and other amenities Charles Street Development Corporation (CSDC) sites retail benefits as one reason they?re studying a potential streetcar line connecting the Inner Harbor to University Parkway in Charles Village in Baltimore, MD.
Cleveland OH Improve local access to shopping, services and other amenities Along the new BRT Corridor in downtown Cleveland, the city focused much of its initial redevelop efforts on one small street ? East Fourth Street ? which has been transformed through public and private investment into a mixed use gathering place and an entertainment and night life destination. http://www.east4thstreet.com/
Austin TX Improve local access to shopping, services and other amenities Cities are increasingly holding regular events that draw people to hang out in downtown retail and restaurant districts. In Austin, TX, Friday lunchtime free concerts draw downtown workers out of their offices for lunch and socializing in front of City Hall.
Galveston TX Improve local access to shopping, services and other amenities Texas is working hard to promote its cities as international retail destinations. The state offers the TaxFree program that refunds a portion of the state sales tax paid on purchases made in participating Galveston shops. Refunds are processed through TaxFree Texas under state legislation that encourages international visitors to shop while visiting Texas and recognizes the enormous impact of international tourism in the state. The city of Galveston is using the law to promote their downtown retail district, where they have created a ?Tax Free Shopping Zone.?
San Antonio TX Improve local access to shopping, services and other amenities The San Antonio River Walk is a network of walkways along the San Antonio River that operate as a public park and features shops, restaurants and bars. The area has been an important part of the city?s character since the mid-60s and has grown into a major restaurant and retail destination. The city is currently working to build upon the strength of this area through the implementation of the River Walk Master Plan, which was adopted in 2008. The first phase of implementation is currently underway, including repairs and upgrades along the walkway and the Mission Reach project, and effort to better connect the area with bike and hike trails.
Charlottesville VA Improve local access to shopping, services and other amenities Cities are increasingly holding regular events that draw people to hang out in downtown retail and restaurant districts. In Charlottesville, VA, the popular Fridays After Five concerts draw thousands of people every week to the city?s pedestrian mall and restaurant district, which is the terminus of the city?s downtown circulator trolley bus.
Newport News VA Improve local access to shopping, services and other amenities Cities are increasingly holding regular events that draw people to hang out in downtown retail and restaurant districts. Newport News, VA holds free Friday evening concerts that range from Celtic rock to Motown to classical orchestras.
Los Angeles CA Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces Parks and open space access are fundamental elements of complete communities. Los Angeles has installed 30 fitness zones in underserved communities to promote physical activity. Many are located in existing city parks near playground equipment. The Los Angeles Neighborhood Land Trust works in inner-city Los Angeles neighborhoods to create pocket parks and other green spaces in places that are underserved and have high rates of chronic disease. More info on their work in LA here: http://www.lanlt.org/case-studies.php
Los Angeles CA Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces Since 2007 there have been a number of ?cap park? project around the country, which involve covering a freeway and using the new surface for greenspace. Los Angeles is working to create the Hollywood Freeway Central Park by capping 101 freeway in the middle of Los Angeles. There are a few other proposals for cap parks in Los Angeles.
Oakland CA Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is providing funding and technical assistance for parks as part of its Active Living Research program. In Oakland?s Lower San Antonio neighborhood, RWJF worked with local schools to renovate playground equipment and create more open space.
San Francisco CA Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces San Francisco?s ?Pavement to Parks? projects seek to temporarily reclaim these unused swathes and quickly and inexpensively turn them into new public plazas and parks. During the temporary closure, the success of these plazas will be evaluated to understand what adjustments need to be made in the short term, and ultimately, whether the temporary closure should be a long term community investment. Some of the projects, like that on Divisidero Street, turn 3-4 curbside parking spaces into temporary parks with benches, planters and tables. Other projects reclaim underutilized pieces of roadways at intersections, like the new ?Castro Commons? that was created at the busy intersection of 17th and Castro. Several of the ?trial? projects have been adopted by the neighborhood as permanent parks.
Denver CO Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces Urban gardens are popping up throughout Denver thanks to DUG ? Denver Urban Gardens ? which is a nonprofit movement to ?grow community ? one urban garden at a time.? DUG works to secure sustainable land for gardens and build new gardens through the region, and also works on related food system policy. Denver Urban Gardens has partners with the Colorado School of Public Health on a s community-based research initiative to explore how gardens, as neighborhood places, support healthy living, and made a video: http://vimeo.com/21818738. Recently, DUG teamed up with the Trust for Public Land and the Helen K. and Arthur E. Johnson Foundation to construct a new park in one an ethnic neighborhood on the border between Denver and Aurora. The 2.1-acre plot of land is near several affordable housing developments and home to many Somalian, Burmese, and Afghan immigrants.
Atlanta GA Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces The area surrounding Atlanta?s Piedmont Park has seen major investments in recent years, as people desire to move into the neighborhood to be near the park. Between 2000 and 2009, the neighborhood gained 4,500 people in 1,880 units, the Trust for Public Land estimates.
Iowa City IA Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces Downtown/pedestrian malls have been hit-or-miss throughout planning history, but a few winners are working to build on the success of these important public spaces. The Ped Mall in Iowa City is using programming to continue to enhance its successful pedestrian mall. This summer on the Pedestrian Plaza, pianos are popping up for passers-by to sit down and put on an impromptu show. The city also launched a new Saturday market on the mall, featuring food and craft vendors. The new market is a trial as the city contemplates moving their larger farmers market from its current location to a more central, downtown spot.
Louisville KY Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is providing funding and technical assistance for parks as part of its Active Living Research program. In Louisville, RWJF partners with community centers to start fitness classes and provide fitness equipment so people had a safe place to exercise.
Boston MA Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces Since 2007 there have been a number of ?cap park? project around the country, which involve covering a freeway and using the new surface for greenspace. The Big Dig in Boston included the creation of Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway over Interstate 93.
Missoula MT Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces Modeled off the successful weekly Ciclovia held in Bogota, Columbia, Missoula, MT has held Sunday Streets events for two years running and with rave reviews. The event transforms seven blocks of city streets downtown into car-free zones and offers a number of events and activities for the thousands of people who participate. The event is coordinated by the Parks and Recreation Department, Downtown Business Improvement District and a local advocacy group, Missoula in Motion.
Raleigh NC Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces Parks and recreation departments have increasingly been a part of initiatives to promote active living and sustainable transportation. Oftentimes, they can serve as a "convener" of the health professionals and the planning professionals, since they regularly engage with both groups. In the State of North Carolina, the state parks & recreation department has taken a lead on active transportation efforts, tying the goals of increasing walking and bicycling with improving recreational opportunities and access to parks. Cities such as Charlotte, Greensboro, and Raleigh have made park planning a significant component of their efforts to create more complete communities.
New York NY Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces In 2009, New York City opened the High Line, a remarkable linear park that runs on a mile and a half of elevated freight rail track through Manhattan?s West Side.
New York NY Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is providing funding and technical assistance for parks as part of its Active Living Research program.
In South Bronx, where 44% of residents live in poverty, RWJF provided funding for two waterfront parks and a greenway (1.5 acres of waterfront greenway, 8.5 miles of green streets and 12 acres of waterfront park land). It worked with the City of New York and the South Bronx Active Living Campaign to clean up vacant lots and assemble land for the parks. To encourage residents to use the new parks, RWJF started a social marketing campaign called ?Now Playing in the South Bronx? and promote events like Healthy Living Block Parties.
Cincinnati OH Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces Cincinnati has the highest per-capita recreation participation rate for all cities reporting information to TPL. The Recreation Commission?s programs attracted over 3.2 million participant-visits in 2009, including 691,000 youth. The city?s population in 2009 was 330,000. Membership at city-owned recreation centers is very inexpensive--$25 for a yearly membership to 29 recreation centers and 26 pools ($10 for seniors and youth).
Cleveland OH Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is providing funding and technical assistance for parks as part of its Active Living Research program. In Cleveland, RWJF helped transform the Broadway/Slavic Village neighborhood, home to many Czech and Polish immigrants, into a walkable neighborhood with a trail connecting an elementary school, health care center, grocery store and other amenities. Community groups also set up fitness programs to encourage people to be more physically active.
Oklahoma City OK Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces Oklahoma City is developing a new comprehensive plan, called ?PlanOKC.? It is a long-range plan with the goal of ensuring a healthy environment, community, and economy for residents. One of the plan?s core elements is called ?PlayOKC,? which addresses the system of parks, open spaces, and recreational facilities that serve our community. From walking trails to soccer fields, playgrounds to picnic areas, we need both public and private places to gather, connect and play. The purpose of PlayOKC is to ensure that our changing populations will be able to access, enjoy, and afford a variety of parks and recreation options as the city grows.
Portland OR Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces The city of Portland has set a goal of getting 25% of all trips taken by bicycle by the year 2030; to that end, Portland is developing a system of Neighborhood Greenways -- biking and walking focused routes that span the city. The greenways feature prominent bike and pedestrian signage and traffic-calming designs. By 2015 Portland plans to have 80% of residents living within one-half mile of a Neighborhood Greenway.
Philadelphia PA Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces The Philadelphia Center City District and the transit agency (SEPTA) teamed up and received a $15 million TIGER II award from the DOT in fall 2010 to redevelop a public plaza outside a transit station and improve connections between different transit modes (SEPTA, PATCO, Amtrak, etc.)
Chattanooga TN Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces PARK(ing) Day is an annual, worldwide event that invites city dwellers everywhere to transform metered parking spots into temporary parks for the public good. In 2011, people created 850 PARKs in more than 180 cities across the world. In Chatanooga, 12 different destinations were made out of parking spaces through an effort by the nonprofit group CreateHere, a group of residents and new recruits working for arts, economic, and cultural development in the urban core. CreateHere worked with Summit Pianos to make sure that some of the ?parks? featured pianos for passers-by to play and enjoy.
Houston TX Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces Houston?s Hermann Park has benefited from the opening of a new light rail line with two stops in the park. The City of Houston also worked with the Hermann Park Conservancy to raise funds to return an old historic miniature railroad back into service to connect the whole park with the light rail stations.
Burlington VT Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces Downtown/pedestrian malls have been hit-or-miss throughout planning history, but a few winners are working to build on the success of these important public spaces. The Church Street Marketplace in Burlington, VT has operated both as a regional retail destination but also as the city?s leading community center since it opened in 1981. The City recognizes the importance of this spot ? both for their economic future and community vitality ? and is working to improve it by extending the vitality of the corridor along its side streets. Burlington received $6M from SAFETEA-LU to expand the pedestrian-oriented design along adjacent side streets, among other improvements. Construction began in March 2011.
Seattle WA Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces Seattle has been aggressive about converting smaller, forgotten spaces into lively pocket parks. At Pinehurst Pocket Park, the community hired Artist Sara Mall Johani to design and install three art components: the plaza incorporates children's games in its surface and is intended to inspire the invention of new games. Sara also sculpted a "replica" of the historic Pinehurst steam tractor that once roamed the neighborhood streets, and installed columnar basalt "mini" columns at each park entrance.
Seattle WA Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces Seattle?s P-Patch program is one of the largest community garden projects in the country, with 68 gardens totaling 23 acres. Approximately 4,400 gardeners maintain 1,900 plots. The City of Seattle?s Department of Neighborhoods runs the program with a $650,000 annual budget and staff of six. Most gardens are in public parks but the City works with property owners to set aside land for gardens all over the city. The City?s comprehensive plan further supports community gardens with a goal of one garden for every 2,000 households in high-density neighborhoods (?urban villages?).
National   Provide access to gathering and recreational spaces The federal government is ramping up efforts to create more parks through the Great Outdoors Initiative, a joint effort by the Departments of Interior, Agriculture, Army, Commerce and White House Council on Environmental Quality to ?reconnect Americans?especially our young people?to the natural world.? The initiative?s purpose is to coordinate recreation management, access and policies across multiple federal agencies and also streamline policies and funding resources. One of the key goals is to target underserved and disadvantaged communities for both access and engagement in the benefits and opportunities for outdoor recreation. Approximately $900 million in federal funds will be appropriated for the program, with most funding coming from the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which is funded through fees paid on offshore oil-and-gas drilling. The program is modeled on a State of Colorado program, Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO), started by current Interior Secretary Ken Salazar while he was the state?s natural resources chief. The GOCO program helped fund many of the Denver region?s bicycle trail corridors and urban parks.