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Oregon's Example Pushing Back Against Cars

 

An Oregon Transportation Research and Education Consortium report sponsored by the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Research and Innovative Technology Administration offers a history lesson in why Oregon has gone further than any other state in resisting the dominance of the automobile.

"A Brief Portrait of Multimodal Transportation Planning in Oregon and the Path to Achieving It, 1890-1974" by Sam Lawry of Portland State University points to Oregon's statewide land use program, urban growth boundaries, Transportation Planning Rule, activist citizenry, progressive-dominated government and, in Portland, modern history of transit investment and self-consciously alternative urban self-concept.

“The story of Oregon’s ‘multimodal’ transportation planning must be written in such as way as to inform [the] commuter ... about the system he thinks just is, how it got there, and how and why he should appreciate its substance," the report notes. "As much as possible, the story, as it is begun here, relates complex subject matter to his life and times, delving into the big controversies that come from society’s deep disagreement over conservation and development, aesthetics and wealth. It dips into older history, then moves more or less chronologically. In order to do justice to the various practitioners and players, it includes four stages of action: the national, the metropolitan, the state governmental and the local.”

The has been added to the Best Practices

A Brief Portrait of Multimodal Transportation Planning in Oregon and the Path to Achieving It, 1890-1974