Reconnecting America People * Places * Possibility

Quotable Street Standards As Parking Policy

Today's Quote of the Day from Jeff Wood's newsletter "The Other Side of the Tracks" comes from a Mineta Transportation Institute research paper:

A minimum width requirement of 36 feet for a residential street automatically provides two 10-foot traffic lanes and two 8-foot parking lanes, making it a de facto parking policy.

The paper explores the rationales underlying the use of minimum street width requirements to mandate street parking and concludes that these policies, in effect, hide the true cost of this excess parking capacity.
The report's authors recommend that the hidden parking policies should be made transparent and subject to public oversight, the double standard between private and public streets should be eliminated, and parking on residential streets should be optional.

The paper, "Amenity or Necessity? Street Standards as Parking Policy," explores the rationales underlying the use of minimum street width requirements to mandate street parking and concludes that these policies, in effect, hide the true cost of this excess parking capacity.

The authors recommend that the hidden parking policies should be made transparent and subject to public oversight, the double standard between private and public streets should be eliminated, and parking on residential streets should be optional.

 A copy of the report has been added to the Resource Center's best practices database.

Read the Executive Summary and download the report.