Reconnecting America People * Places * Possibility

The effects of street connectivity on walkability and access to transit

A 2010 doctoral dissertation on the effects of street connectivity on walkability and access to transit has been added to the Resource Center best practices. "Walking to the station: The effects of street connectivity on walkability and access to transit" was written by Ayse N. Ozbil for his Doctor of Philosophy degree in the College of Architecture at Georgia Institute of Technology.

The thesis analyzes how far urban density, mixed land-uses and street network connectivity are related to transit walk-mode shares and walking distances to/from stations. Among Ozbil's conclusions:

  • Urban form (including density, land-use and street network configuration) affects the proportions of patrons walking to/from the station.
  • Transit oriented policies are better supported by urban development policies and zoning and subdivision regulations that encourage transit-friendly urban forms.
  • The scale at which urban form has an impact on pedestrian travel is of the order of a mile radius, rather than a few blocks around the station.
  • Transit oriented policies are compatible with policies aimed at the enhancement of health and the reduction of obesity through daily physical activity.
  • Emphasis on the contribution of transit-oriented development to the spatial structure of the street network, over and above the impact of sidewalk provision and design and pedestrian safety.